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JANUARY 2017

"State of Nature, Stages of Society: Enlightenment Conjectural History and Modern Social Discourse," Frank Palmeri, Professor of English

 

‌Frank Palmeri

Professor of English
University of Miami

State of Nature, Stages of Society:
Enlightenment Conjectural History and Modern Social Discourse

Wednesday
1-25-17

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Frank Palmeri sees in the conjectural history practiced by Enlightenment philosophers such as Rousseau and Hume a template for the development of the social sciences in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Without documents as evidence, speculative thought shaped the development of anthropology in the 1860s, the political economy of Malthus, Martineau, Mill, and Marx, and the first two generations of sociology in Comte, Spencer, Weber, and Durkheim. Conjectural histories, with their surprising ambivalence toward modernity, influenced Darwin's Descent of Man and Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality, as well as the novels of Walter Scott, George Eliot, and H.G. Wells. Palmeri concludes his investigation with the return of conjectural thought in recent histories of early religion, political organization, and Neolithic society.

Frank Palmeri is Professor of English with courtesy appointments in Philosophy and Classics at the University of Miami. In 2016, Professor Palmeri was appointed a Cooper Fellow in the College of Arts & Sciences. He has published on comparative literary studies of the 18th and 19th centuries; satire in narrative and graphic forms; conjectural history and the history of social thought; animal studies; and the novels of Thomas Pynchon. In addition to being comparative (primarily involving British, French, German, and American), his work is interdisciplinary—calling on the critical methods of history, visual studies, and philosophy. He has published two other authored books—Satire in Narrative: Petronius, Swift, Gibbon, Melville, Pynchon (University of Texas, 1990), and Satire, History, Novel: Narrative Forms 1665-1815 (University of Delaware, 2003). His current project is Satire and the Public Sphere: Caricature, Novels, and Politics in England, 1790-1910.

Read Professor Palmeri's article in The Chronicles of Higher Education on conjectural history now.

Read his article in TIME on conjectural history and the anthropocene.


New Voices on Digital Humanities @ UM (Logo)


Friday
1-27-17
12:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

Susanna Allés Torrent

 
Susanna Allés Torrent, Visiting Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures
Digital Philology or When the Love for Words Becomes Computational

 

Lindsay Thomas

 
Lindsay Thomas
, Assistant Professor of English
What is a "Critical" Digital Humanities?

 

More Information >>

FEBRUARY 2017
Edith Bleich 2017 Graphic of English Speech Bubbles

Joshua Katz

Cotsen Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Classics, Princeton University

What Is English and How Do We Know?


Thursday
2-2-17
7:00 PM

Public Lecture
Shalala Student Center - Ballroom East
Public Invited

iTunes image icon for podcasts Listen to the Podcast

Friday
2-3-17
10:00am

“The Goddess and Damned Wrath: How a Linguist Reads
the Iliad
Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

iTunes image icon for podcasts Listen to the Podcast

This sentence is written in English. So, however, are these:

itjmhoF oj ofuujsx tj fdofuoft tjiU
We synt gumcynnes Geata leode
I shall not want
All mimsy were the borogoves
There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs
That was a lekker braai, bru
i <3 u

What it means to be English is evidently not a simple matter.

More information >>


"Middle Kingdom and Empire of the Rising Sun: Sino-Japanese Relations, Past, and Present," June Teufel Dreyer, Professor of Political Science


‌June Teufel Dreyer

Professor of Political Science
University of Miami

Middle Kingdom and Empire of the Rising Sun:
Sino-Japanese Relations, Past and Present

POSTPONED

Wednesday
2-8-17

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
 

Japan and China have been rivals for more than a millennium. In recent times, China was the more powerful until the late nineteenth century, while Japan took the upper-hand in the twentieth. Now, China's resurgence has emboldened it even as Japan perceives itself falling behind, exacerbating long-standing historical frictions. Dreyer argues that recent disputes should be seen as manifestations of embedded rivalries rather than as issues whose resolution would provide a lasting solution to deep-standing disputes.

June Teufel Dreyer is Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami where she teaches courses on China, U.S. defense policy, and international relations. She has also lectured to, and taught a course for, National Security Agency analysts. Formerly senior Far East specialist at the Library of Congress, she has also served as Asia policy advisor to the Chief of Naval Operations and as commissioner of the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission established by the U.S. Congress. Dreyer is also the author of China’s Political System: Modernization and Tradition (Routledge, 2014), currently in its ninth edition. Professor Dreyer has published widely on the Chinese military, Asian-Pacific security issues, China-Taiwan relations, Sino-Japanese relations, ethnic minorities in China, and Chinese foreign policy.

Read the review in Wall Street Journal.


Graduates photo for "Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Humanities: Teaching at Independent Schools"

 

Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Humanities: Teaching at Independent Schools

Dan Cohen

Upper School English & Social Studies Teacher, Maumee Valley Country Day School

Aldo J. Regalado

Upper School History Teacher, Palmer Trinity School

Steven Sowell

Upper School English Instructor & English Department Chair, Louisville Collegiate School

Friday
2-24-17
12:30 PM

Seminar:
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

This workshop, led by three UM PhDs in Philosophy, History, and English, explores careers in independent schools, focusing on topics such as conducting job searches, designing secondary curricula and instruction, and understanding the culture of this educational environment. Following brief presentations by the panelists, the workshop will shift to Q&A and group discussion.

More Information >>


MARCH 2017

Merry Wiesner-Hanks graphic (GIF)

Merry Wiesner-Hanks

Distinguished Professor of History, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

Adjusting Our Lenses to Make Women Visible (Public Lecture)


Thursday
3-2-17
7:00 PM

Public Lecture
Wesley Gallery
Public Invited

The oldest surviving examples of eyeglasses in the world, dating from around 1330, were discovered hidden beneath the floorboards of the nuns’ choir in the Cistercian Kloster Wienhausen in northern Germany.

More Information >>

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Presented by the University of Miami Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, the College of Arts & Sciences, Center for the Humanities, the Joseph Carter Memorial Fund, and the Department of History.‌

MEDIEVAL, RENAISSANCE, AND BAROQUE BIENNIAL CONFERENCE

 Expanding Visions:
Women in the Medieval and Early Modern World




March 2 - 4, 2017
Wesley Gallery


Click here for more information


"“Big Bosses”: A Working Girl’s Memoir of Jazz Age America," Robin Bachin, Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History and Assistant Provost for Civic and Community Engagement


‌Robin Bachin

Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History
University of Miami

Big Bosses:
A Working Girl’s Memoir of Jazz Age America

Wednesday
3-8-17

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Sharp, resourceful, and with a style all her own, Althea Altemus embodied the spirit of the independent working woman of the Jazz Age. In her memoir, Big Bosses, she vividly recounts her life as a secretary for prominent (but thinly disguised) employers in Chicago, Miami, and New York during the late teens and 1920s. Alongside her we rub elbows with movie stars, artists, and high-profile businessmen, and experience lavish estate parties that routinely defied the laws of Prohibition. Anchored by extensive annotation and an afterword from historian Robin F. Bachin, which contextualizes Altemus’s narrative, Big Bosses provides a one-of-a-kind peek inside the excitement, extravagances, and the challenges of being a working woman roaring through the ’20s.

Robin F. Bachin is the Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History and Assistant Provost for Civic and Community Engagement at the University of Miami. Her areas of research and teaching include American urban, environmental, immigration, and cultural history. Her first book, Building the South Side: Urban Space and Civic Culture in Chicago, 1890-1919, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2004 and won the Award for Outstanding Contribution to Illinois History and Heritage. Bachin’s current book project is Tropical Urbanism: Modernity, Exoticism, and the Creation of South Florida, 1890-1965. She has received fellowships from the Graham Foundation for the Advancement of the Fine Arts, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Teagle Foundation, and the Driehaus Foundation. She was one of the first recipients of the University of Miami Library Digital Fellowship, which supported the creation of her digital archive on “Travel, Tourism, and Urban Growth in Greater Miami.”


William Shakespeare's first folio - graphic for Peter Holland lecture

This lecture is presented with the support of the ACCAC Distinguished Lecturers Program

Peter Holland

McMeel Family Professor in Shakespeare Studies, University of Notre Dame

Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies


Thursday
3-23-17
4:30 PM

REGISTER

Wesley Gallery
Public Invited

The book we know as the First Folio wasn’t given that title by the two Shakespeare colleagues who posthumously published his plays in 1623. Its formal name, Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies, is more functional, laying out genres for the 36 collected plays – like a TV channel offering varying types of movies.

Peter Holland, one of the world’s foremost authorities on Shakespeare, examines the choice and significance of the volume’s title. What was behind it? How does thinking about genre help us understand how the plays work?

More Information >>


GIF: "Emperor of all Maladies" and "The Gene" -- books by Siddhartha Mukherjee

Siddhartha Mukherjee

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author

Can We THINK Our Way Out of Cancer? (Public Lecture)


Monday
3-27-17
7:00 PM

REGISTER

Public Lecture
Gusman Concert Hall
Public Invited

“Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee dazzled readers with his Pulitzer-winning The Emperor of All Maladies in 2010. That achievement was evidently just a warm-up for his virtuoso performance in The Gene: An Intimate History, in which he braids science, history, and memoir into an epic with all the range and biblical thunder of Paradise Lost. . . . Thanks to Dr. Mukherjee’s remarkably clear and compelling prose, the reader has a fighting chance of arriving at the story of today’s genetic manipulations with an actual understanding of both the immensely complicated science and the even more complicated moral questions.”New York Times Science Section

More Information >>


APRIL 2017

"The Social Value of Drug Addicts: Uses of the Useless," Bryan Page, Professor of Anthropology


‌Bryan Page

Professor of Anthropology
University of Miami

The Social Value of Drug Addicts:
Uses of the Useless

Wednesday
4-5-17

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Drug users are typically portrayed as worthless slackers, burdens on society, and just plain useless—culturally, morally, and economically. By contrast, this book argues that the social construction of some people as useless is in fact extremely useful to other people. Leading medical anthropologists Merrill Singer and J. Bryan Page analyze media representations, drug policy, and underlying social structures to show what industries and social sectors benefit from the criminalization, demonization, and even popular glamorization of addicts. Synthesizing a broad range of key literature and advancing innovative arguments about the social construction of drug users and their role in contemporary society, this book is an important contribution to public health, medical anthropology, popular culture, and related fields.

Professor Page specializes in studying the consumption of drugs in urban, street-based settings. His 42-year career in the anthropology of drug use has focused on the consequences and impacts of various patterns of legal and illegal drug use in a wide variety of cultural settings. Among his funded projects supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health are studies of: poly-drug use in the Seminole Tribe of Florida, poly-drug use among Cuban immigrants, prescription drug use among women, HIV risk and disease progression among injection drug users (IDUs) in Miami, response to the HIV epidemic among Haitian Women, Haitian youth and gang activity, and needle-cleansing behavior among Miami IDUs. These projects have resulted in the publication of over 100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, plus two books co-authored with Merrill Singer: The Social Value of Drug Addicts and Comprehending Drug Use: Ethnographic Research at the Social Margins (Rutgers University Press, 2010).


Vladimir Kulić book

Presented by the Center for the Humanities Modernities Interdisciplinary Research Group

Cosponsored by
the Department of History
and the School of Architecture

Vladimir Kulić

Associate Professor, Florida Atlantic University School of Architecture

Spaces of Non-Alignment: Urban Planning and the Global Cold War in Socialist Yugoslavia


Friday
4-14-17
3:30pm

REGISTER

Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room

Vladimir Kulić's talk will address issues of architecture and non-alignment in Yugoslavia during the Cold War.  In addition to discussing historical concerns and aesthetic methodologies, his research tackles today’s greatly problematic reception of the avant-garde heritage of Yugoslav socialism. The theme of this presentation is additionally related to Dr. Kulić's work on a forthcoming exhibition about architecture in socialist Yugoslavia, which he is co-curating at MOMA. The show is scheduled to open in the summer of 2018.

More Information >>


 

Presented with
the University of Miami Libraries

The Future of Academic Publishing

Seth Denbo

Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives, American Historical Association

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Associate Executive Director and Director of Scholarly Communication, Modern Language Association

Alison Mudditt

Director, University of California Press

Tuesday
4-18-17
4:00PM

Workshop:
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

Click here to watch the Livestream


 Martha Nell Smith (bio photo)

Presented by the Center for the Humanities Digital Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Group

Cosponsored by the University of Miami Libraries, and the Departments of English and Modern Languages and Literatures

Martha Nell Smith

Professor of English, Founding Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, University of Maryland

Diversity is Not a Luxury in DH: New Challenges Post-2016


Thursday
4-20-17
4:30PM

REGISTER

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

More Information >>

 


 ‌

Cosponsored by the University of Miami Center for the Humanities, Office of the President and Provost, College of Arts & Sciences, Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami Institute for the Advanced Study of the Americas, the Graduate School, and the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes.

CONSORTIUM OF HUMANITIES CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

Medical Humanities Summer Institute
Day 1: Global Health  |  Day 2: Medical Humanities for Practioners

Medical Humanities Summer Institute  |  Day 1: Global Health  |  Day 2: Medical Humanities Practioners  |  May 19-20, 2017. Open to the Public  |  Registration Required


May 19 - 20, 2017
Newman Alumni Center
Open to the Public  |  Registration Required


Click here for more information