Guest Lecturers

Arthur Marotti

Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English
Wayne State University

 

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive


Arthur F. Marotti is Distinguished Professor of English Emeritus at Wayne State University. He is the author of John Donne, Coterie Poet (1986); Manuscript, Print and the English Renaissance Lyric (1995); and Religious Ideology and Cultural Fantasy: Catholic and Anti-Catholic Discourses in Early Modern England (2005). He has also edited or co-edited ten collections of scholarly essays. Professor Marotti served as the editor of the journal Criticism (1986-96) and is a member of the editorial board of English Manuscript Studies 1100-1700, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, Literature Compass, and JNL: Journal of the Northern Renaissance

 

Paleography Seminar


Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 10:00am

UM Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students Only

Otto G. Richter Library
Humanities Center Conference Room, Suite 100
1300 Memorial Drive

This will be a workshop on reading English secretary, mixed, and italic hands from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will look at about a dozen (pre-circulated) examples and, with the help of paleography essays by Muriel St.Clare-Byrne and R.W. McKerrow (copies to be sent in advance), we will examine and decipher as a group a number of poems written in easy to very difficult scripts. Although there is no quick way of becoming skilled in reading old scripts and although one has to learn the quirks and features of each scribe's hand, this exercise should encourage participants to use archival manuscript materials that can yield great benefits to their research.

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The Verse Nobody Knows: Rare or Unique Poems in Early Modern English Manuscript Collections


Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 4:30pm


Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

In various archives in Great Britain and the U.S. there are hundreds of manuscripts from the early modern period that contain poetic texts. Those associated with major and minor canonical authors have been accounted for, edited, and made part of literary history. Those that are anonymous or are by little-known writers have largely been ignored. This lecture deals with a selection of (mostly anonymous) rare or unique poems found in surviving manuscript poetry collections of the 16th and 17th centuries in relation to the familial, collegial, and other coterie environments in which they were written. This includes verse composed by manuscript compilers, politically dangerous or obscene texts, and texts related to scandals and topical events of local interest. Among the examples are poems concerning mother-son incest and the supposed providential revival of a hanged woman who was unjustly convicted of infanticide. Professor Marotti suggests that these neglected texts, which expand our sense of the writing practices in the period, not only need to be acknowledged in literary history, but also studied for what they reveal about the social life of early modern literary texts.


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Grants Review Workshop for Faculty & Graduate Students


Friday, October 11, 2013 - 10:00am

UM Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students Only

School of Communications
Wolfson Building, Room 4029

This workshop will be in three parts. First, Professor Marotti will offer detailed advice to seminar participants about how to construct good grant proposals. Second, we will look at a (pre-circulated) group of successful grant proposals. Third, we will go over together whatever in-progress (pre-circulated) proposals faculty would be willing to have "workshopped." The goal of the last is constructive criticism from which all the participants might learn.


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Mentoring Workshop for Faculty & Graduate Students


Friday, October 11, 2013 - 2:00pm

UM Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students Only

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

Drawing on his experience of mentoring younger faculty in his own department and (at his Dean's request) both tenured and non-tenured faculty from other departments, Professor Marotti will offer some advice about and discuss with participants such topics as professional development, preparing for tenure and promotion, and the challenging task of taking one's scholarly career to the next stage after being awarded tenure. Professor Marotti will be joined by Susanne Woods, Provost Emerita, Wheaton College, and Visiting Distinguished Scholar in English at UM.





Shigehisa Kuriyama

Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History
Professor and Chair, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Professor, Department of the History of Science
Harvard University

Professor Kuriyama is the author of The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (1999), a study of the different views of health and medicine held by the ancient western and eastern civilizations, which was awarded the William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine. His research explores broad philosophical issues through the lens of specific topics in comparative medical history (Japan, China, and Europe). At Harvard,  he has also been actively engaged in expanding the horizons of teaching and scholarly communication through the creative use of digital technologies. He was a pioneer in the development of course trailers at Harvard, founded the Harvard Shorts competition for scholarly clips, and has held workshops on multimedia presentations of research for faculty and students at many universities around the world. He currently serves on the FAS Standing Committee on IT, the Advisory Committee for the secondary Ph.D. field in Critical Media Practice, and is a Senior Researcher at Harvard’s metaLAB.


The geography of ginseng and the alchemy
of needs

Thursday, November 14, 2013 — 4:30 pm

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

     http://www.as.miami.edu/humanities/images/icons/itunes.png Listen to the podcast

Of all the plants in the pharmacopoeia of traditional Chinese medicine, none was more treasured than ginseng. For most of the past, the plant was found only in Korea and Manchuria. Starting in the early eighteenth century, however, the geography of ginseng underwent a dramatic expansion—both through transplantation and new discovery. Professor Kuriyama's talk will start with the story of this expansion, and then pursue the surprising web of consequences that followed from the plant’s spread. The modern history of ginseng, he will show, is a global tale that entwines the histories of different Asian countries not only with each other, but also with Europe and North America. It is also a tale of the strange alchemy of needs, which ultimately brings together the fates of substances as disparate as tea and opium, kombu, salt, and MSG.

 

Digital Media and the New Horizons of Pedagogy

Friday, November 15, 2013 — 12:00pm
UM Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students Only

CAS Gallery
Wesley Foundation
1210 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146

In this seminar, Professor Kuriyama will discuss the use of multimedia assignments (rather than the standard response or research papers); this is a presentation for faculty and graduate students as future faculty. 

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Creative Uses of New Media for More Compelling Presentations of Research

Friday, November 15, 2013 — 3:00 pm
UM Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students Only

Richter Library 3rd Floor Faculty Exploratory

This hands-on workshop on using Keynote (the $20 Mac equivalent of Powerpoint) will be useful to anyone who lectures or gives conference presentations. The audience would be primarily faculty and graduate students who are Mac users (since Keynote doesn't run on PCs), but everyone who has gone through this workshop has found it both eye-opening and empowering (PowerPoint users are invariably converted to Keynote, and PC users often decide to switch to Macs). The workshop will be accessible to people who've never used Keynote before, but will include techniques that are probably new even to most Keynote users.

 


 

POSTPONED

Joan B. Landes

Walter L. and Helen Ferree
Professor of History
Pennsylvania State University


Thursday, April 3, 2014 — 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

Professor Landes's wide-ranging interests include European gender, cultural, intellectual, and political history, with a focus on eighteenth-century France; interdisciplinary eighteenth-century studies; the history of modern feminist theory and feminist movements; the history of Enlightenment science and medicine; visual imagery; and French colonialism. Her most recent publication is Gorgeous Beasts: Animal Bodies in Historical Perspective (2012). She is the author of Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution (1988) and Visualizing the Nation: Gender, Representation, and Revolution in Eighteenth-Century France (2001). She has also edited Feminism, the Public and the Private (1998), and coedited Monstrous Bodies/Political Monstrocities in Early Modern Europe (2004). She has served as President of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, the NEH, the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College, among others.

 

POSTPONED

Elephants without Borders: Exhibition,
Art, and Science

Thursday, April 3, 2014 — 4:30pm


Animal Studies and Environmental Humanities Lecture

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive


This talk focuses on two elephants brought as war booty in 1798 to the Paris menagerie at the Jardin des Plantes. Traveling across colonial, national, and continental borders, they became objects of public amusement and subjects of artistic and scientific study. Against questions of “the animal” and “the human” in republican science and art, Professor Landes will consider how the least delicate of animals was perceived to be among the most sensitive and intelligent of beasts: along with man, one of nature’s most elevated creatures.