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JANUARY 2016

Modernities Lecture by Sabine Hake "Ferdinand Lassalle, the first Socialist Celebrity"
Presented by
the Center for the Humanities
Modernities Interdisciplinary Research Group

Sabine Hake

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Texas, Austin

Ferdinand Lassalle, the First Socialist Celebrity


Tuesday
1-19-16
4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited
Listen to the Podcast

“I believe in Ferdinand Lassalle, the Messiah of the nineteenth century…” thus begins a socialist version of the Apostles’ Creed popular among his followers. Today he is best remembered as one of the founding fathers of German Social Democracy. But at the time, Lassalle was also the object of intense emotional attachments and fantasy productions. As part of an emerging socialist mythology, his celebrity status attests to an unusually personal engagement with political questions made possible by new literary genres and forms of political engagement. At first glance, the public fascination with his personal life seems far removed from the realities of working-class life and antithetical to the socialist ethos of community. But as this talk will demonstrate, the socialist movement in fact relied heavily on the products of the culture industry to strengthen socialist commitments and forge proletarian identifications. This point is important not only for a better understanding of the history of socialism but also for a historical perspective on the merging of political culture and celebrity culture today.

Sabine Hake holds the Texas Chair of German Literature and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research on Weimar and Third Reich culture and German cinema focuses on the relationship between cultural practices and aesthetic sensibilities, on the one hand, and social movements and political ideologies, on the other. She is currently working on two book projects: a reassessment of German cinema from the perspective of media convergence and a study on the German proletariat as an imaginary subject in literature, art, film, and political theory.



 
Mary Lindemann (calendar headshot)

‌Mary Lindemann

Professor and Chair of History, University of Miami

The Merchant Republics:
Amsterdam, Antwerp, and Hamburg, 1648-1790

Wednesday
1-20-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

The Merchant Republics analyzes the ways in which three major economic powerhouses – Amsterdam, Antwerp, and Hamburg – developed dual identities as “communities of commerce” and as republics over the course of the long eighteenth century (c. 1648–1790). In addition to discussing the qualities that made these three cities alike, this volume also considers the very real differences that derived from their dissimilar histories, political structures, economic fates, and cultural expectations. While all valued both their republicanism and their merchant identities, each presented a different face to the world and each made the transition from an early modern republic to a modern city in a different manner.

Mary Lindemann is Professor of History and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Miami. She is the author of four books and of numerous articles. She has also been the recipient of several major grants and awards, among them the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities; the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health; the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences and the Humanities; the Flemish Institute for Advanced Study; and the Shelby Cullom Davis Center, Princeton University.

 


‌‌Bio photo for David Konstan (NYU) for Antiquities Lecture
Presented by
the Center for the Humanities
Antiquities Interdisciplinary Research Group
Cosponsored by the Department of Classics and the Department of Religious Studies

David Konstan

Professor of Classics, New York University

Of Love and Loyalty: The View from Classical Antiquity


Thursday
1-21-16
4:30 PM

CAS Gallery
Public Invited
 
Listen to the Podcast

The German sociologist Georg Simmel asked: “If love continues to exist in a relationship between persons, why does it need faithfulness?” Love alone should be enough. Is loyalty a distinct kind of bond, more durable than love? If so, are the reasons for being faithful different from those for loving? In Professor Konstan's talk, he will suggest that in classical Greece and Rome, love and loyalty were in fact more closely associated than they are today. Examples will be drawn from texts by Aristotle, Cicero, Euripides, and Edward Albee.

David Konstan is Professor of Classics at New York University; he previously taught at Brown University and Wesleyan University. His research focuses on ancient Greek and Latin literature, especially comedy and the novel, and classical philosophy. In recent years, he has investigated the emotions and value concepts of classical Greece and Rome, and has written books on friendship, pity, the emotions, and forgiveness. He has also written on ancient physics and atomic theory, and on literary theory, and is currently working on a book on the ancient Greek conception of beauty, and on a verse translation of the two Senecan tragedies about Hercules. He has been President of the American Philological Association, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Jon Meacham Book Covers (GIF)
Jon Meacham - Centennial Pulitzer Prizes
This program is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council in partnership with the University of Miami Center for the Humanities. It is part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative, a joint venture of the Pulitzer Prizes Board and the Federation of State Humanities Councils in recognition of the 2016 centennial of the Prizes.

Jon Meacham

Presidential Historian

The Art of Leadership:
Lessons from the American Presidency


Tuesday
1-26-16
7:00 PM

Maurice Gusman Concert Hall
Public Invited

Jon Meacham explores what 21st-century leaders in different fields of endeavor can learn from the greatest moments of our common past. This presentation — non-partisan in content and tone — ranges from Jefferson’s pragmatism to Jackson’s management of public opinion, JFK’s capacity to recover from his own mistakes, and Reagan and FDR’s ability to manage conflicting egos. Meacham discusses how history can inform the decisions all of us make every day in positions that demand creative and innovative solutions.

“Meacham wisely has chosen to look at Jefferson through a political lens, assessing how he balanced his ideals with pragmatism while also bending others to his will.”  
— Jill Abramson, The New York Times Book Review

Jon Meacham is the author of Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power (2012), a No. 1 New York Times bestseller that has been named one of the best books of the year by The New York Times Book Review and The Washington Post, among others. His most recent book, Destiny and Power, chronicles the life of George H. W. Bush, drawing on his personal diaries and on extraordinary access to the president and his family, thereby painting an intimate and surprising portrait of an intensely private man who led the nation through tumultuous times. Meacham received the Pulitzer Prize for American Lion, his bestselling 2008 biography of Andrew Jackson. He is a regular contributor on Meet the Press, Morning Joe, and Charlie Rose.‌

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FEBRUARY 2016

Bio photo for Robin Fleming
This lecture is presented with the support of
the ACCAC Distinguished Lecturers Program

Robin Fleming

Professor of History, Boston College

Living with the Fall of Rome: Britain in the "Dark Ages"


Friday
2-5-16
4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

The lecture examines six different communities in post-Roman Britain engaged in recycling old Roman ceramics and glass. We will learn something about each of these groups–the kinds of people they were, the recent histories of the places in which they lived, the strategies they developed for procuring old Roman pots and glass, and then about the ways they chose to use this material. We will thereby broaden the story of the transition from Roman to not-Roman to include not just politics, but the lived experience of people who were having to figure out how to be in a period of radical material loss.

Professor Fleming is a Professor of History at Boston College, and a 2013 MacArthur Fellow. Her books include Britain After Rome: The Fall and Rise, 400-1070 (2011), Kings and Lords in Conquest England (2004), and Domesday Book and the Law: Society and Legal Custom in Early Medieval England (2003). She has received grants or fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Harvard Society of Fellows; the Bunting Institute; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University; and the Guggenheim Foundation. She is a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Royal Historical Society, and the London Society of Antiquaries.


Professor Amie Thomasson (calendar bio photo)

‌Amie L. Thomasson

Professor of Philosophy, University of Miami

Ontology Made Easy

Wednesday
2-10-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream

 

This volume argues that ontology faces a challenge that comes from the “easy approach to ontology”—that many ontological questions can be answered by undertaking trivial inferences from uncontroversial premises. This book aims to develop the easy approach to ontology, showing how it leads to both a first-order simple realism about the disputed entities and a form of meta-ontological deflationism that takes ontological disputes themselves to be misguided, since existence questions may be answered by straightforward conceptual and/or empirical work. It also aims to show the easy approach to be a viable and attractive alternative to the quagmire of hard ontology.

Amie Thomasson is Professor of Philosophy and Cooper Fellow in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Miami. She is the author of Ordinary Objects and Fiction and Metaphysics, and co-editor (with David W. Smith) of Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. In addition, she has published more than 50 book chapters and articles on topics in metaphysics, metaontology, fiction, philosophy of mind and phenomenology, the philosophy of art, and social ontology.

 


Stanford Logo (Orange Background)

Machu Picchu GIF for Richard Burger
 

Richard Burger

Charles J. MacCurdy Professor of Anthropology, Yale University

Violence, Warfare, and Religion in the Emergence of Early Peruvian Civilization


Thursday
2-18-16
7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
Storer Auditorium
Public Invited
iTunes image icon for podcasts Listen to the Podcast

By considering defensive architecture, weapons, iconographic depictions, and paleopathology, Professor Burger will demonstrate that warfare was not a major factor in the development of early Andean civilization. This belies recent claims that humans are intrinsically warlike and that war provided the stimulus for the development of complex societies.

[In Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas], Yale anthropology professor Burger and Salazar, curator of the Machu Picchu collection at Yale's Peabody Museum, present . . . a welcome, in-depth resource for anyone interested in pre-Columbian archaeology and the anthropology of sacred sites.”
— Whitney Scott, Booklist

Richard Burger is Charles J. MacCurdy Professor of Anthropology at Yale University and Curator in the Division of Anthropology at the Peabody Museum. An archaeologist specializing in the emergence of civilization in the Central Andes, Burger has carried out research in Peru for over two decades. His books on South American prehistory include Chavin and the Origin of Andean Civilization (1992), and Machu Picchu: Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas (2008). Burger also served as Chair of the Senior Fellows of Pre-Columbian Studies at Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. and is currently the President of the Institute of Andean Research (NY).

More Information >>


"Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World Conference"

The Kay Pacha Symposium is presented in co-sponsorship with the Center for the Humanities, the Department of Anthropology, the Program in Latin American Studies, the Miami Institute for the Americas, and Otto G. Richter Library.

 

Symposium
Kay Pacha: Reciprocity with the Natural World


Saturday, February 20, 2016
Lowe Art Museum
 

This symposium, featuring specialists in ancient Andean art and archaeology, will present the latest research on objects from the exhibit that speak to Andean relationships with the natural world. The symposium, open to the general public, will be followed by an opportunity for the audience and scholars to enter into a conversation about the different values we can bring to understanding our delicate ecosystems.

Click here to view the program


The Present Future of the University and the Humanities Lecture Series


Jeffrey J. Williams

Professor of English, Carnegie Mellon University

Brave New University

 

Generations and Contemporary American Fiction (Cosponsored by the Department of English)


Thursday
2-25-16
4:30 PM

Brave New University
Otto G. Richter Library,
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

Friday
2-26-16
4:00 PM

Generations and Contemporary American Fiction:
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

More Information >>


MARCH 2016

 
Professor Nicholas Patricios (calendar headshot)

‌Nicholas N. Patricios

Professor and Dean Emeritus of Architecture, University of Miami

The Sacred Architecture of Byzantium:
Art, Liturgy, and Symbolism in Early Christian Churches

Wednesday
3-16-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Nicholas N. Patricios offers a comprehensive survey, from the age of Constantine to the fall of Constantinople, of the nexus between buildings, worship and art. Beyond categorizing and describing the churches themselves, which are richly illustrated with photographs, plans and diagrams, the author interprets the sacred liturgy that took place within these holy buildings, tracing the development of the worship in conjunction with architectural advances made up to the fifteenth century. This sumptuous book is an essential guide not only to individual features of the churches but also to the wider significance of Byzantine art and architecture.

Nicholas N. Patricios is Professor and Dean Emeritus of Architecture and former Master of Stanford Residential College at the University of Miami. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture from the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, where he received the Gresty Prize; a postgraduate diploma in Town and Regional Planning with Distinction from the University of Manchester, where he was awarded the Heywood Medal; and a Ph.D from University College London. He is the author of Building Marvelous Miami: An Architectural and Urban History as well as over 50 academic articles in scholarly journals. He has been the recipient of many awards including a Fulbright Fellowship to Greece and a Visiting Scholarship to the American Academy in Rome.

 


The Present Future of the University and the Humanities Lecture Series


Timothy Burke

Professor and Chair of History, Swarthmore College

Designing the Liberal Arts for Uncertainty (Public Lecture)


The Seating Chart:
The Ritual Life of Sovereignty in Africa's Cold War
(Cosponsored by the Department of History)


Thursday
3-17-16
4:30 PM

Designing the Liberal Arts for Uncertainty
Otto G. Richter Library,
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

Friday
3-18-16
2:00 PM

The Seating Chart
Otto G. Richter Library,
Third Floor Conference Room 
Public Invited

More Information >>


APRIL 2016

Stanford Logo (Orange Background)

Marcyliena Morgan GIF for Humanities Calendar Page
 

Marcyliena Morgan

Professor of African and African American Studies; Founding Executive Director, Hiphop Archive and Research Institute, Harvard University

Hiphop and the Global Influence of American Cultural Politics


Wednesday
4-6-16
5:00 PM

"Crates to Classroom: The Birth of the Hiphop Archive at Harvard University"
(Presented by the Office of Academic Enhancement)

CAS Gallery

Thursday
4-7-16
12:30 PM

Seminar: "Black Lives Matter"
Discussion with Professor David Ikard's AAS290 students
Dooley Memorial, Room 209

Thursday
4-7-16
7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
Storer Auditorium
Public Invited

Friday
4-8-16
12:30 PM

Lunch Seminar: "Defending and Representing Hiphop Culture: 'Did You Mean What You Said?' "
Philosophy Seminar Room, Ashe Administration, Rm 735
For Faculty & Graduate Students

Fans are generally unaware of the political, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of hiphop, especially its complex ideology regarding citizenship, knowledge, truth, language, representation, innovation, and inclusion. Global hiphop mainly conveys progressive American politics of gender, racial, and social class inclusion, transforming both American and global politics in the process.

“In The Real Hiphop, Marcyliena Morgan has written a brilliant account of the origins of hiphop and the process through which it is created and evolves, from its most elemental and raw forms into the highly processed and polished versions that have become the lingua franca of popular American culture. Morgan – the founder of the world’s only hiphop archive – raises the analysis of hiphop to an entirely new level of scholarship, explicating it as a linguistic, sociological, and political phenomenon.”
— Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University

Marcyliena Morgan, Professor of African and African American Studies, is founding executive director of the Hiphop Archive and Research Institute at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research at Harvard University. Dr. Morgan has conducted field research on the African Diaspora, as well as on identity and language in the USA, England, and the Caribbean. Her books include Discourse and Power in African American Culture (2002), The Real Hiphop: Battling for Knowledge, Power, and Respect in the Underground (2008), and Speech Communities (2014).

More Information >>


 
Berit Brogaard (profile headshot) for Humanities Calendar

‌Berit Brogaard

Professor of Philosophy, University of Miami

The Superhuman Mind:
Free the Genius in Your Brain

Wednesday
4-13-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Berit Brogaard and Kristian Marlow study people with astonishing talents—memory champions, human echolocators, musical virtuosos, math geniuses, and synesthetes who taste colors and hear faces. What these gifted individuals have in common is that through practice, injury, an innate brain disorder, or even more unusual circumstances, they have managed to gain a degree of conscious access to the potent processing power below our awareness. Delving into the neurological underpinnings of these abilities, the authors reveal how we can acquire some of them ourselves—from perfect pitch and lightning fast math skills to supercharged creativity.

Berit Brogaard, D.M.Sci., Ph.D., is a Professor of Philosophy and the Director of the Brogaard Lab for Multisensory Research at the University of Miami. Her educational background includes a medical degree in neuroscience and a doctorate in philosophy. Her areas of research include perception, synesthesia, blindsight, consciousness, neuro-psychiatry and emotions. She has written over 100 peer-reviewed articles and some 400 popular articles on neuroscience and health issues. She is the author of On Romantic Love (Oxford) and Transient Truths (Oxford).

 


Publishing Seminar (Humanities Calendar 2016)

 Cosponsored by the University of Miami Libraries

The Future of Academic Publishing

Peter Berkery
Executive Director, Association of American University Presses (AAUP)

Peter Potter
Director of Publishing Strategy, University Libraries, Virginia Tech


Wednesday
4-20-16
4:00 PM

Seminar:
Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

What will the university press of the future look like? This panel, intended for faculty and graduate students in the humanities as well as librarians, will begin by laying out the current status of academic publishing (e.g., impact of the e-book; declining library sales; consequence of the acquisition of presses by conglomerates); it will then turn to discuss prospects for the future (e.g., publishing on digital platforms that enable interactive features; open access). Topics to be addressed include coming changes in the nature of publishing operations, business models, and organizational contexts.

Peter Berkery has been Executive Director of AAUP since early 2013. He was previously Vice President and Publisher for the US Law Division at Oxford University Press. Berkery has a BA in Classical Studies from Boston College, and an MA and a JD from The American University, as well as a Master of Laws in Taxation from George Washington University.

Peter Potter, who was editor-in-chief at Cornell University Press since 2006, became Director of Publishing Strategy for University Libraries at Virginia Tech in January 2016. Before Cornell, he worked at The Pennsylvania State University Press as editor-in-chief and associate director, and held editor and acting director positions at the Wesleyan University Press. Throughout his nearly 30 years in university press publishing, Potter has been a leader in efforts to integrate new technologies into scholarly publishing practices, specifically working to leverage the complementary strengths of a university press and a university library to elevate faculty research, for example by helping to launch the Office of Digital Scholarly Publishing at Penn State--one of the first centers to be jointly sponsored by a university library and a university press. He received his bachelor's degree in history from Virginia Tech and his master's degree in history from the University of Virginia.