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JANUARY 2015
Dan Cohen, Founding Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America
Cosponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and Otto G. Richter Library

Digital Humanities

Dan Cohen

Founding Executive Director, Digital Public Library of America

Exploration and Discovery in the Digital Public Library of America

Thursday
1-15-15

REGISTER

4:30 PM

Exploration and Discovery in the Digital Public Library of America
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

More Information >>


Susan Basalla May, Principal, Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates

Cosponsored with the Graduate School and the College of Arts & Sciences

REGISTER

Expanding Career Opportunities for Ph.D.s

Secrets of a Ph.D. Headhunter – 5 Key Tips for Landing a Job Outside Academia


Friday
1-16-15
3:00 PM

Seminar:
CAS Gallery
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students


Susan Basalla, Principal, Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates.

Find out how to get a job outside academia, even if you aren’t yet sure whether you really want one. Sue will share tips and strategies from her experience as an executive recruiter for higher education. You’ll learn what employers really think about your resumé, how to stand out in the crowd, and the critical first step that most graduate students overlook when hunting for non-academic jobs.

Susan Basalla
is the co-author of So What Are You Going To Do With That? Finding Careers Outside Academia, whose third edition will be published by University of Chicago Press in December 2014.  She earned her Ph.D. in English at Princeton University and for more than a decade has been a regular columnist for the Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Beyond the Ivory Tower” column as well as a frequent speaker at universities across the nation on alternative careers for graduate students. She is a principal with Storbeck/Pimentel & Associates, an executive search firm specializing in higher education.


"The Renaissance in Italy: A Social and Cultural History of the Rinascimento" by Guido Ruggiero


‌Guido Ruggiero

Professor of History, University of Miami

The Renaissance in Italy:
A Social and Cultural History of the Rinascimento

Wednesday
1-21-15
8:00 PM Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream

 

This book offers a rich and exciting new way of thinking about the Italian Renaissance as both a historical period and a historical movement. Guido Ruggiero's work is based on archival research and new insights concerning social and cultural history and literary criticism, with a special emphasis on everyday culture, gender, violence, and sexuality. The book offers a vibrant critical study of a period too long burdened by anachronistic and outdated ways of thinking about the past. Familiar, yet alien; pre-modern, but suggestively post-modern; attractive and troubling, this book returns the Italian Renaissance to center stage in our past and in our historical analysis.

Guido Ruggiero has published more than two dozen books on the Renaissance and related topics including, most recently, Machiavelli in Love: Sex, Self, and Society in Renaissance Italy (2007) and The Blackwell Companion to the Worlds of the Renaissance (2002). He is an elected member of the Ateneo Veneto and has been a Fellow or Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, Harvard's Villa I Tatti in Florence and the American Academy in Rome.


Presented by
the Center for the Humanities
Critical Theory Reading Group

Rita Felski

William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English, University of Virginia

Critical and Postcritical Reading

Friday
1-23-15

4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

More Information >>


Animal Studies and Environmental Humanities Lecture

Cosponsored by the Department of History

 

Joan B. Landes

Walter L. and Helen Ferree Professor of History
Pennsylvania State University

Elephants without Borders: Exhibition, Art, and Science


Thursday
1-29-15

REGISTER

4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited


New York Public Library & the British Library. Slide for the lecture series by William Walker (2014-2015)

William Walker

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library; Former Dean and University Librarian

The New York Public Library

The Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, the Newberry Library, and the Harry Ransom Center (U Texas - Austin)


Friday
1-30-15

REGISTER

12:30 PM

School of Nursing - Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

This seminar series, mainly aimed at graduate students, will explore the unique cultures of each library, trace the historical growth of collections, and provide insight into best strategies for navigating these complex organizations to enable discovery of hidden collections and resources. Participants will learn about the libraries’ access policies; their discovery tools and catalogs; and rights, use, and permissions protocols. William Walker will be joined by UM Faculty who will discuss their experiences researching at the British Library, the Bodleian (Oxford), Cambridge University Library; New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, the Newberry Library, and the Harry Ransom Center (U Texas - Austin); the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel, and Biblioteca Nacional de España. Participants are encouraged to suggest additional libraries to be discussed in future sessions.

William Walker is a Professor in the University of Miami’s Otto G. Richter Library where from 2003–13, he served as Dean and University Librarian. Prior to joining UM, Walker was the Senior Vice President and Andrew W. Mellon Director of the New York Public Library where he oversaw the Research Libraries’ programs. He has served as a consultant to the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, the British Library, Japan’s National Diet Library, the National Library of Brazil, the Union Theological Seminary, and the Museum of Modern Art.


FEBRUARY 2015
Presented by
the Department of Philosophy

Cosponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Department of English.

Peter Kivey

Board of Governors Professor of Philosophy, Rutgers University

Tell Me a Story


Monday
2-2-15
3:00 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room



 

Rita Dove

Commonwealth Professor of English, University of Virginia

History’s Crevices: Sonata Mulattica’s Forgotten Prodigy


Thursday
2-5-15

REGISTER

7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
History's Crevices
Location TBA

Sonata Mulattica, the twelfth collection from the former U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize recipient follows the real career of the violin prodigy George Polgreen Bridgetower (1780–1860), a former pupil of Haydn, as well as the purported grandson of an African prince, whose friendship with Beethoven ended in rivalry over a woman.

“A virtuosic treatment of a virtuoso’s life, the poems use all registers—nursery rhymes, diary entries, drama—and are stuffed with historical and musical arcana. Yet the book remains highly accessible, reading much like a historical novel.”  — The New Yorker

Rita Dove, Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia, served as Poet Laureate of the US, Consultant to the Library of Congress, and Poet Laureate of the Commonwealth of Virginia. She is the recipient of both the National Humanities Medal and the National Medal of the Arts.  

More Information >>


"Language of Atoms" by Professor Wilson Shearin

Wilson Shearin, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Miami

‌Wilson Shearin

Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Miami

The Language of Atoms:
Performativity and Politics in Lucretius' De rerum natura

Wednesday
2-11-15
8:00 PM Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

The Language of Atoms studies Lucretius great poem, De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things) in light of an understanding of language as performative, providing psychic therapy or creating new verbal meanings, rather than passively describing the nature of the universe. To this end, Shearin discusses promising, acts of naming, and the larger political implications of these linguistic acts. At the center of De rerum natura is a persistent juxtaposition of humans and atoms that carries implications for both the creative potential of language and its deceptive powers.

“In his rigorous exploration of the performative dimension of the De rerum natura, Shearin takes the study of the language of Lucretius to a new level of critical sophistication, and offers a fresh and compelling understanding of the poem's claims to a practical, therapeutic function.”
— Duncan Kennedy, University of Bristol

Wilson Shearin received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.  As a Fulbright scholar, he studied in the Philosophy Department at the Université de Fribourg in Switzerland and was a faculty fellow for the University of Miami’s Center for the Humanities. His intellectual interests lie largely at the intersection of philosophy and literature – both philosophical and theoretical approaches to literature and literary approaches to philosophical texts. He is the co-editor of Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism (2012).


Tara McPherson, Associate Professor, University of South California

Cosponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and Otto G. Richter Library

Digital Humanities

Tara McPherson

Associate Professor of Critical Studies, University of Southern California

Scholarship by Design: The Humanities + the Digital
The Digital Humanities for the Rest of Us

Thursday
2-12-15

REGISTER

4:30 PM

Scholarship by Design: The Humanities + the Digital
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

Friday
2-13-15

REGISTER

2:00 PM

The Digital Humanities for the Rest of Us
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

 More Information >>


Presented by
Africana Studies and the Graduate School Distinguished Scholar Series

Cosponsored by the Center for the Humanities, Dean Blake, and the Graduate School

Tracy Sharpley-Whiting

Distinguished Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies and French
Vanderbilt Unviersity

Bricktop's Paris: African American Women in Paris Between the Two World Wars


Tuesday
2-17-15
3:30 PM

Location TBA


 "Revisioning Early Modern Hispanisms" - An Academic Conference in honor of Anne J. Cruz, Professor of Spanish

Presented by the Department of
Modern Languages and Literatures

Cosponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Center for the Humanities

 

Revisioning Early Modern Hispanisms
An Academic Conference in honor of
Anne J. Cruz,
Professor of Spanish



Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Conference


February 19 - 21, 2015

More information coming soon...


New York Public Library & the British Library. Slide for the lecture series by William Walker (2014-2015)

William Walker

Professor, Otto G. Richter Library; Former Dean and University Librarian

Bibliothèque nationale de France

Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel and Biblioteca Nacional de España


Friday
2-27-15

REGISTER

12:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

This seminar series, mainly aimed at graduate students, will explore the unique cultures of each library, trace the historical growth of collections, and provide insight into best strategies for navigating these complex organizations to enable discovery of hidden collections and resources. Participants will learn about the libraries’ access policies; their discovery tools and catalogs; and rights, use, and permissions protocols. William Walker will be joined by UM Faculty who will discuss their experiences researching at the British Library, the Bodleian (Oxford), Cambridge University Library; New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, the Newberry Library, and the Harry Ransom Center (U Texas - Austin); the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel, and Biblioteca Nacional de España. Participants are encouraged to suggest additional libraries to be discussed in future sessions.

William Walker is a Professor in the University of Miami’s Otto G. Richter Library where from 2003–13, he served as Dean and University Librarian. Prior to joining UM, Walker was the Senior Vice President and Andrew W. Mellon Director of the New York Public Library where he oversaw the Research Libraries’ programs. He has served as a consultant to the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the British Library, Japan’s National Diet Library, the National Library of Brazil, the Union Theological Seminary, and the Museum of Modern Art.


MARCH 2015
Presented by
the Center for the Humanities
Atlantic Studies Research Group


Cosponsored by the American Studies Program

Duncan Faherty

Associate Professor of English, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY

Title TBA


Thursday
3-5-14
4:30 PM

Location TBA


"The Crisis of Islamic Masculinities" by Amanullah De Sondy

Amanullah De Sondy, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies

‌Amanullah De Sondy

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, University of Miami

The Crisis of Islamic Masculinities

Wednesday
3-18-15
8:00 PM Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Rigid notions of masculinity are causing crisis in the global Islamic community. These are articulated from the Qur’an, its commentary, historical precedents and societal, religious and familial obligations. Some Muslims who don't agree with narrow constructs of manliness feel forced to consider themselves secular and therefore outside the religious community. In order to evaluate whether there really is only one valid, ideal Islamic masculinity, The Crisis of Islamic Masculinities explores key figures of the Qur’an and Indian-Pakistani Islamic history, and exposes the precariousness of tight constraints on Islamic manhood. Amanullah De Sondy argues that the constrainers of masculinity have used God and women to think with and to dominate through and that rigid gender roles are the product of a misguided enterprise.  

“This book opens the way to rethinking what it means to be a man in the Islamic tradition, showing the intricate ways in which constructions of femininity and masculinity are intertwined. It is a must-read for those wishing to understand the Islamists' obsession with sexuality, their rejection of gender equality, and their invocation of religious dogma as the basis for gender rights.”
— Ziba Mir-Hosseini, Centre for Islamic and Middle Eastern Law,
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London

Amanullah De Sondy connects the study of religion to the key themes of gender, ethnicity, race, and pluralism. He has taught Islamic Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he earned his PhD; the University of Strathclyde; and the University of Stirling in Scotland. In 2009, he moved to the USA, where he taught religious studies at Ithaca College before joining the University of Miami in 2010.


Cosponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Departments of History, Political Science, and Religious Studies

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Chancelor Professor of History, University of California - Irvine
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar

Title TBA


Thursday
3-19-15
4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room


"Medicine and Poetry: From the Greeks to the Enlightenment" - Classics Symposia logo for event on March 20th, 2015.

Presented by
the Department of Classics

Cosponsored by
the Center for the Humanities

Medicine and Poetry:
from the Greeks to the Enlightenment


Keynote Speaker:
Brooke Holmes, Princeton University

Friday, March 20, 2015

REGISTER

CAS Gallery / Wesley Foundation
1210 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146

From Homer’s depiction of wounds and Lucretius on plague and death to Erasmus Darwin’s rhymed verse portrayals of plants and zoology and beyond, poetic texts have reflected, disseminated, and actively engaged with contemporary ideas about medicine and the body. While scholarly work on poetry or the history and philosophy of science has long proceeded in parallel, the conjunction of the two remains understudied. With the recent surge of interest in medical humanities and sub-topics such as narrative medicine and the verbal (in)articulation of bodily pain, this timely conference investigates how medical knowledge is expressed, often by non-specialists, in poetry.

More information >>




Cosponsored by
the Center for the Humanities
and the Department of English

American Conference for Irish Studies


National Chapter Meeting


March 25-28, 2015

Fort Lauderdale, FL

More Information >>


Headshot/profile photo of Wilmot James

Wilmot James

Member of Parliament, South Africa

Nelson Mandela and the Making of Modern South Africa


NOTE:
New Date

Tuesday
3-31-15

REGISTER

4:30 PM

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Public Invited

More Information >>


APRIL 2015
Julia Flanders, Northeastern University

Cosponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and Otto G. Richter Library

Digital Humanities

Julia Flanders

Head of Digital Scholarship Group; Professor of the Practice of English, Northeastern University

Skills, Tools, and Knowledge Work in the Digital Academy
Big Data, Small Data, Well-Shaped Data

Thursday
4-2-15

REGISTER

4:30 PM

Skills, Tools, and Knowledge Work in the Digital Academy
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

Friday
4-3-15

REGISTER

2:00 PM

Big Data, Small Data, Well-Shaped Data
Otto G. Richter Library
Cuban Heritage Collection

 More Information >>



 

William Wallace

Barbara Murphy Bryant Distinguished Professor of Art History

Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel: 500 Years


Thursday
4-9-15

REGISTER

7:00 PM

Public Lecture:
Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel
Storer Auditorium

In 1508, Michelangelo was called back to Rome to undertake the painting of the Sistine Chapel ceiling. Michelangelo objected that “painting is not my art,” and he had no previous experience directing a large-scale campaign in the demanding medium of fresco, but here he employed more than a dozen painters and craftsmen to help carry out the herculean project. William Wallace concludes that Michelangelo di Lodovico di Buonarotti Simoni was not, or at least not only, the epitome of the lonely, tormented, quarrelsome genius.

“...the artist who emerges from these pages is paradoxically a far richer character than the one captured in fiction—as complicated as his art, and as fiercely intelligent as his times.”
— Ann Landi, ArtNews

William E. Wallace is the Barbara Murphy Bryant Distinguished Professor of Art History at Washington University in St. Louis. He is an internationally recognized authority on Michelangelo and his contemporaries and the author or editor of six different books on Michelangelo.  

More Information >>



Presented by
Department of History


Cosponsored by the Center for the Humanities

Edward Muir

Clarence L. Ver Steeg Professor in the Arts & Sciences, Northwestern University

Ruggiero's Renaissance


Friday
4-10-15
TBA

Location TBA


"The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216" by Hugh Thomas

Hugh Thomas, Professor of History, University of Miami

‌Hugh Thomas

Professor of History, University of Miami

The Secular Clergy in England 1066-1216:
The Struggle over Clerical Celibacy

Wednesday
4-15-15

8:00 PM

Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

The secular clergy were among the most influential and powerful groups in European society during the central Middle Ages. Yet they have received almost no attention from scholars, unlike monks, nuns, or secular nobles. In The Secular Clergy in England, 1066-1216, Hugh Thomas aims to correct this deficiency through a major study of the secular clergy below the level of bishop in England. Secular clerics kept the Church running in the world beyond the cloister wall, with responsibility for the bulk of pastoral care and ecclesiastical administration. They assumed a major role in the rise of royal bureaucracy and were instrumental to the intellectual and cultural flowering of the twelfth century, including the invention of universities.

Hugh M. Thomas specializes in the history of medieval Europe and of England. He is the author of Vassals, Heiresses, Crusaders, and Thugs: The Gentry of Angevin Yorkshire, 1154-1216 (1993); The English and the Normans: Ethnic Hostility, Assimilation, and Identity 1066 - c. 1220 (2005); and The Norman Conquest: England after William the Conqueror (2007) and has held fellowships at the University of Miami's Center for the Humanities, the University of Pennsylvania, the National Humanities Center, All Souls College, Oxford, and Princeton University. He has also received funding from the ACLS and the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Ed Ayers, President, University of Richmond

Cosponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and Otto G. Richter Library

Digital Humanities

Edward Ayers

President, University of Richmond

The University in the Digital World

Tuesday
4-21-15

REGISTER

4:30 PM

The University in the Digital World
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

More Information >>


MAY 2015
 

William Germano Workshop


Wednesday
5-7-15
9:00 AM

Workshop
Student Activities Center - Iron Arrow Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Thursday
5-8-15
9:00 AM

Workshop
Student Activities Center - Iron Arrow Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students