SPRING 2016

Modernities Lecture by Sabine Hake "Ferdinand Lassalle, the first Socialist Celebrity"Sabine Hake

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures
University of Texas, Austin

Ferdinand Lassalle, the First Socialist Celebrity

Tuesday, January 19, 2016 at 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public

Presented by the Center for the Humanities Modernities Interdisciplinary Research Group

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‌‌“I believe in Ferdinand Lassalle, the Messiah of the nineteenth century…” thus begins a socialist version of the Apostles’ Creed popular among his followers. Today he is best remembered as one of the founding fathers of German Social Democracy. But at the time, Lassalle was also the object of intense emotional attachments and fantasy productions. As part of an emerging socialist mythology, his celebrity status attests to an unusually personal engagement with political questions made possible by new literary genres and forms of political engagement. At first glance, the public fascination with his personal life seems far removed from the realities of working-class life and antithetical to the socialist ethos of community. But as this talk will demonstrate, the socialist movement in fact relied heavily on the products of the culture industry to strengthen socialist commitments and forge proletarian identifications. This point is important not only for a better understanding of the history of socialism but also for a historical perspective on the merging of political culture and celebrity culture today.

Sabine Hake bio photoSabine Hake holds the Texas Chair of German Literature and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research on Weimar and Third Reich culture and German cinema focuses on the relationship between cultural practices and aesthetic sensibilities, on the one hand, and social movements and political ideologies, on the other. She is currently working on two book projects: a reassessment of German cinema from the perspective of media convergence and a study on the German proletariat as an imaginary subject in literature, art, film, and political theory.


David Konstan

Professor of Classics
New York University

Of Love and Loyalty: The View from Classical Antiquity

Thursday, January 21, 2016 at 4:30pm

CAS Gallery / Wesley Foundation
Free & Open to the Public

Presented by the Center for the Humanities Antiquities Interdisciplinary Research Group
Cosponsored by the Department of Classics and the Department of Religious Studies

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Bio photo for David Konstan (NYU) for Antiquities LectureThe German sociologist Georg Simmel asked: “If love continues to exist in a relationship between persons, why does it need faithfulness?” Love alone should be enough. Is loyalty a distinct kind of bond, more durable than love? If so, are the reasons for being faithful different from those for loving? In Professor Konstan's talk, he will suggest that in classical Greece and Rome, love and loyalty were in fact more closely associated than they are today. Examples will be drawn from texts by Aristotle, Cicero, Euripides, and Edward Albee.

David Konstan is Professor of Classics at New York University; he previously taught at Brown University and Wesleyan University. His research focuses on ancient Greek and Latin literature, especially comedy and the novel, and classical philosophy. In recent years, he has investigated the emotions and value concepts of classical Greece and Rome, and has written books on friendship, pity, the emotions, and forgiveness. He has also written on ancient physics and atomic theory, and on literary theory, and is currently working on a book on the ancient Greek conception of beauty, and on a verse translation of the two Senecan tragedies about Hercules. He has been President of the American Philological Association, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.




Jon Meacham bio photo

Jon Meacham

Presidential Historian

The Art of Leadership: Lessons from the American Presidency

Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 7:00pm

Maurice Gusman Concert Hall
1314 Miller Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146
Free & Open to the Public



Robin Fleming

Professor of History
Boston College

Living with the Fall of Rome: Britain in the "Dark Ages"

Friday, February 5, 2016 at 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public

This lecture is presented with the support of the ACCAC Distinguished Lecturers Program

 



"Britain After Rome" book cover by Robin Fleming

The lecture examines six different communities in post-Roman Britain engaged in recycling old Roman ceramics and glass. We will learn something about each of these groups–the kinds of people they were, the recent histories of the places in which they lived, the strategies they developed for procuring old Roman pots and glass, and then about the ways they chose to use this material. We will thereby broaden the story of the transition from Roman to not-Roman to include not just politics, but the lived experience of people who were having to figure out how to be in a period of radical material loss.


Bio photo for Robin FlemingProfessor Fleming is a Professor of History at Boston College, and a 2013 MacArthur Fellow. Her books include Britain After Rome: The Fall and Rise, 400-1070 (2011), Kings and Lords in Conquest England (2004), and Domesday Book and the Law: Society and Legal Custom in Early Medieval England (2003). She has received grants or fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Harvard Society of Fellows; the Bunting Institute; the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton; the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies at Harvard University; and the Guggenheim Foundation. She is a fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Royal Historical Society, and the London Society of Antiquaries.


"How To Be An Intellectual" by Jeffrey J. WilliamsJeffrey J. Williams

Professor of English
Carnegie Mellon University

The Present Future of the University and the Humanities: Brave New University

Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public

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 Reading for Lecture:

"Innovation for What? The Politics of Inequality in Higher Education"

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American higher education is going to hell in a handbasket, and this talk will tell you why. In particular, many current policies have disbanded the fundamental aim of equality, instituted in Jefferson's plans for Virginia through the Truman Commission, replacing it with "freedom of choice" and "personal responsibility." The talk will present cases–such as student debt–where this is not an abstraction but has real consequences for students and other citizens, and will suggest policies that will enhance this ideal of the university. 


Generations and Contemporary American Fiction ‌

Friday, February 26, 2016 at 4:00pm

Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public

Cosponsored by the Department of English

Reading for Lecture:

lock icon to use for secured PDF "Generation Jones and Contemporary US Fiction"

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We've all heard about the "sixties generation," the cohort that remade music and other aspects of American culture. However, that generation has had less influence on fiction, and in fact the two subsequent generations, Generation Jones and Generation X, have had far more. This talk studies the waves of contemporary fiction from those generations–writers from Jonathan Franzen and Lorrie Moore to Chang-Rae Lee and Colson Whitehead–and makes a case for studying generations, which provide one dimension of cultural formation and identity that we have neglected in literary and cultural studies.


Jeffrey Williams is Professor of English and Literary and Cultural Studies at Carnegie Mellon University. He has published widely on the history of the novel, contemporary American fiction, the history of criticism, and the American university. He regularly publishes in magazines such as Dissent and The Chronicle of Higher Education, as well as academic journals. His books include PC Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy (1994); The Institution of Literature (2001); Critics at Work: Interviews (2004); Theory and the Novel: Narrative Reflexivity in the English Tradition (2009); and How to Be an Intellectual: Essays on Criticism, Culture, and Politics (2014). He is one of the editors of The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (2001; 2nd ed. 2010), and also served as editor of the Minnesota Review from 1992 to 2010.

 


Tim Burke

Professor and Chair of History
Swarthmore College

The Present Future of the University and the Humanities:
Designing the Liberal Arts for Uncertainty

Thursday, March 17, 2016 at 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public

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One of the most common strategies for defending liberal arts education is to argue that in a fast-changing world, the only way to prepare today's students for the careers and lives they will pursue is through a liberal arts curriculum. It's a common strategy because it's true, in both banal and profound ways. The economist John Kay has pointed out that most of what human beings aspire to in life is best obtained indirectly, that seeking the shortest distance between where we are and where we want to be often paradoxically ensures we will never approach our desired goals. Most existing liberal arts curricula only address unpredictability in the most vague and accidental ways; but what would the structure of liberal arts learning look like if it was centrally aimed at understanding and dealing with contingency and uncertainty?


‌The Seating Chart: The Ritual Life of Sovereignty in Africa's Cold War

Friday, March 18, 2016 at 2:00pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

Free & Open to the Public

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 Cosponsored by the Department of History

As part of a larger effort by historians in many fields of reconsidering the history of the global Cold War in light of new evidence and new paradigms, Professor Burke’s current research examines how global superpowers and newly independent African sovereigns simultaneously tutored each other in the etiquette and performance of their respective roles within the post-1945 interstate system, and how the Cold War was lived within various cultural and ritual contexts in official and civic institutions. This talk will concentrate in particular on how gifts, condolences, thank-yous, state dinners, and other ceremonial forms within the interstate system were scripted, enacted, and subverted within new African states and in the circulation of African leaders, officials, and delegates in the United States and United Kingdom.

 


Tim Burke is Professor and Chair of History at Swarthmore College. His main field of specialty is modern African history, specifically southern Africa, but he has also worked on U.S. popular culture and on computer games. Professor Burke teaches a wide variety of courses at Swarthmore, including surveys of African history, the environmental history of Africa, the social history of consumption, history of leisure and play, and a cultural history of the idea of the future. He is the author of Lifebuoy Men, Lux Women: Commodification, Consumption, and Cleanliness in Modern Zimbabwe (1996) and the co-author of Saturday Morning Fever: Growing Up With Cartoon Culture (1999). He is currently completing a book on individual experience and agency in twentieth-century Zimbabwe.


FALL 2015

Abena Busia bio photo

Abena Busia

Professor and Chair, Department of Women's and Gender Studies
Rutgers University

Locating the Politics of Feminist Knowledge:
The "Women Writing Africa" Project

Thursday, September 10, 2015 at 3:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public
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Professor Busia will share lessons learned from almost two decades of working on "Women Writing Africa," a four-volume publishing project of cultural restoration that aims to restore African women’s voices to the public sphere. It is often in women’s everyday popular culture, the culture we take for granted, that feminist knowledge is produced. Women’s knowledge is often hidden knowledge; and African ways of knowing discredited knowledge. Seeing through women’s eyes, we can locate the fault lines of memory, and thereby change prevailing assumptions about African knowledge, culture, and history.

"Women Writing Africa: West Africa and the Sahel" "Women Writing Africa: The Southern Region" "Women Writing Africa: The Eastern Region""Traces Of a Life" Poetry Book by Abena Busia



Poetry Reading

Negotiating Diasporas: Poems Old and New

Friday, September 11, 2015 at 12:30pm

College of Arts & Sciences Gallery / Wesley Foundation
  1210 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146
Free & Open to the Public
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Abena Busia is Professor and Chair, Department of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She is the co-director and co-editor of the groundbreaking Women Writing Africa Project, a multi-volume anthology published by the Feminist Press at CUNY. She is also the author of two poetry collections, Testimonies of Exile (1990) and Traces of a Life (2008). She is the current board Chair of the AWDF-USA, a sister organization to the African Women's Development Fund, which is the first and only pan-African funding source for women-centered programs and organizations. She teaches courses on African American and African diaspora literature, colonial discourse, and black feminism.

"The Comic Image in British Print Culture 1820-1850" - Brian Maidment

Brian Maidment

Professor of the History of Print
Liverpool John Moores University

The Comic Image in British Print Cultures, 1820-1850

Tuesday, September 16, 2014 — 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
Free & Open to the Public

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This extensively illustrated lecture seeks to re-evaluate the years between 1820 and 1850, the period between the gradual demise of the great tradition of political caricature represented by Gillray and Rowlandson and the flowering of black-and-white illustration in the novels and mass circulation magazines of the early Victorian period. Professor Maidment will suggest that during this period, the widespread use of wood engraving and lithography, combined with an emergent mass market for print culture, energized and popularized the comic image. Across a wide range of print genres — song-books, play-texts, Christmas gift books and annuals, and, especially, periodicals — comic art was developing both new modes and forms and creating a new relationship between image and text. This volatile, experimental and frenetic phase within the history of comic art both democratized and transformed the ways in which humor was produced and consumed.

Brian Maidment is Professor of the History of Print in the English Department at the Liverpool John Moores University in Liverpool, England. He also holds Visiting Professorships at the University of Ghent and at the Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, where he has taught a week-long graduate seminar on the history of prints since 2002. He has published widely on nineteenth-century print culture, especially Ruskin, writing by laboring class writers, early Victorian periodicals, and mass circulation publishing. More recent work has centered on prints and visual culture, especially early nineteenth-century caricature and comic illustration. His publications include Reading Popular Prints 1780–1870 (1997) and Dusty Bob—A Cultural History of Dustmen 1790–1870 (2007), and Comedy, Caricature and the Social Order 1820–1850 (2012).


Elephants without Borders: Exhibition, Art, and Science

Thursday, January 29, 2015 — 4:30pm

Animal Studies and Environmental Humanities Lecture

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

This talk focuses on two elephants brought as war booty in 1798 to the Paris menagerie at the Jardin des Plantes. Traveling across colonial, national, and continental borders, they became objects of public amusement and subjects of artistic and scientific study. Against questions of “the animal” and “the human” in republican science and art, Professor Landes will consider how the least delicate of animals was perceived to be among the most sensitive and intelligent of beasts: along with man, one of nature’s most elevated creatures.

 

Joan B. Landes

Walter L. and Helen Ferree
Professor of History
Pennsylvania State University


Professor Landes's wide-ranging interests include European gender, cultural, intellectual, and political history, with a focus on eighteenth-century France; interdisciplinary eighteenth-century studies; the history of modern feminist theory and feminist movements; the history of Enlightenment science and medicine; visual imagery; and French colonialism. Her most recent publication is Gorgeous Beasts: Animal Bodies in Historical Perspective (2012). She is the author of Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution (1988) and Visualizing the Nation: Gender, Representation, and Revolution in Eighteenth-Century France (2001). She has also edited Feminism, the Public and the Private (1998), and coedited Monstrous Bodies/Political Monstrocities in Early Modern Europe (2004). She has served as President of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, the NEH, the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College, among others.


Headshot/profile photo of Wilmot JamesWilmot James

Member of Parliament, South Africa

Nelson Mandela and the Making of Modern South Africa

Tuesday, March 31, 2015 — 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room

Free & Open to the Public

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Drawing on his Moments with Mandela, Dr. Wilmot James will tell the story of Nelson Mandela's efforts at building a nation from a divided past and improving the lives of the least well-off, efforts that resonate with the philosophy of John Rawls that the distribution of goods and services must always benefit the least advantaged the most. Twenty years after the birth of democracy, some aspects of Mandela's legacy are enduring and others not. Dr. James will present an analysis of why the modern history of South Africa turned out the way it did.

Dr. James is South Africa's Shadow Minister for Health and is the Federal Chairperson of the Democratic Alliance Party. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is an Honorary Professor of Sociology at the University of Pretoria and in the Division of Human Genetics at the University of Cape Town.


Arthur Marotti

Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English
Wayne State University

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room 
1300 Memorial Drive

 

 

‌‌‌‌‌Arthur F. Marotti is Distinguished Professor of English Emeritus at Wayne State University. He is the author of John Donne, Coterie Poet (1986); Manuscript, Print and the English Renaissance Lyric (1995); and Religious Ideology and Cultural Fantasy: Catholic and Anti-Catholic Discourses in Early Modern England (2005). He has also edited or co-edited ten collections of scholarly essays. Professor Marotti served as the editor of the journal Criticism (1986-96) and is a member of the editorial board of English Manuscript Studies 1100-1700, Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, Literature Compass, and JNL: Journal of the Northern Renaissance

 

The Verse Nobody Knows: Rare or Unique Poems in Early Modern English Manuscript Collections

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 4:30pmEnglish Manuscript

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

This will be a workshop on reading English secretary, mixed, and italic hands from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will look at about a dozen (pre-circulated) examples and, with the help of paleography essays by Muriel St.Clare-Byrne and R.W. McKerrow (copies to be sent in advance), we will examine and decipher as a group a number of poems written in easy to very difficult scripts. Although there is no quick way of becoming skilled in reading old scripts and although one has to learn the quirks and features of each scribe's hand, this exercise should encourage participants to use archival manuscript materials that can yield great benefits to their research.

 

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Shigehisa Kuriyama

Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History
Professor and Chair, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations 
Professor, Department of the History of Science
Harvard University

 

‌Professor Kuriyama is the author of The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (1999), a study of the different views of health and medicine held by the ancient western and eastern civilizations, which was awarded the William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine. His research explores broad philosophical issues through the lens of specific topics in comparative medical history (Japan, China, and Europe). At Harvard,  he has also been actively engaged in expanding the horizons of teaching and scholarly communication through the creative use of digital technologies. He was a pioneer in the development of course trailers at Harvard, founded the Harvard Shorts competition for scholarly clips, and has held workshops on multimedia presentations of research for faculty and students at many universities around the world. He currently serves on the FAS Standing Committee on IT, the Advisory Committee for the secondary Ph.D. field in Critical Media Practice, and is a Senior Researcher at Harvard’s metaLAB.

 

The Geography of Ginseng and the Alchemy of Needs

Thursday, November 14, 2013 — 4:30 pm

Otto G. Richter Library
3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive

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Of all the plants in the pharmacopoeia of traditional Chinese medicine, none was more treasured than ginseng. For most of the past, the plant was found only in Korea and Manchuria. Starting in the early eighteenth century, however, the geography of ginseng underwent a dramatic expansion—both through transplantation and new discovery. Professor Kuriyama's talk will start with the story of this expansion, and then pursue the surprising web of consequences that followed from the plant’s spread. The modern history of ginseng, he will show, is a global tale that entwines the histories of different Asian countries not only with each other, but also with Europe and North America. It is also a tale of the strange alchemy of needs, which ultimately brings together the fates of substances as disparate as tea and opium, kombu, salt, and MSG.

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SHAKESPEARE IN MIAMI

 

A Caribbean Accent to Shakespeare's Voice

 

Delpha Charles 

Thursday  February 7, 2013
at 5:00pm

CAS Gallery
Wesley Foundation
1210 Stanford Drive 
Coral Gables, FL 33146

Cosponsored by the Department of English, Caribbean Literary Studies and Creative Writing Programs


A Caribbean Accent to Shakespeare’s Voice is a book of quotations, stories, “translations” of many of Shakespeare’s famous utterances and topics—from love and friendship to the supernatural—embellished by riveting Caribbean characters and scenes.

Born in Montserrat and having grown up in Antigua, Dr. Delpha Charles coined the word AfroCaro to describe herself and Caribbean natives of African descent. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Miami; she received her M.A. from NYU and her B.A. from Howard. She was a Professor of English for twenty years at Miami-Dade College and a Professor of English at Oakwood College, Huntsville.

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Looking at Lear:
Images from the Folger Picture Archive

 

Gail Kern Paster

Director Emerita
Folger Shakespeare Library

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
at 4:30pm

CAS Gallery
1210 Stanford Drive 
Coral Gables, FL 33146

Cosponsored by the Departments 
of English and Theatre Arts


King Lear is replete with arresting stage tableaux: the aged king himself and his Fool, the naked body of Edgar disguised as Poor Tom of Bedlam, the mad Lear buffeted by the storm, Lear holding the dead body of Cordelia. 

The 10,000 digitized Shakespeare images of the Folger picture archive provide an illustrated history of interpretation and reception including many examples from King Lear. What these images show us, however, is that in their efforts to render a true portrait of Shakespeare's Lear, every theatrical age ends up representing itself.

Gail Kern Paster was Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library from 2002 to 2011. The Folger houses the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare materials; as director, Paster made the Folger's materials more accessible to the public and strengthened its educational mission. She is the author of The Idea of the City and the Age of Shakespeare and Humoring the Body: Emotions and the Shakespearean Stage; she served as president of the Shakespeare Association of America and editor of Shakespeare Quarterly.

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The Passions of the Air in King Lear and Macbeth

 

Gail Kern Paster

Director Emerita
Folger Shakespeare Library

Thursday February 14, 2013 
at 4:30pm

Otto G. Richter Library
1300 Memorial Drive
3rd Floor Conference Room
Coral Gables, FL 33146

 


Because of the early modern belief in the connections between the body and the cosmos – microcosm and macrocosm – comparisons of the winds and tides to human passions are commonplace in the period's bodily discourses. "The Egyptians fought against the Egyptians,  the East wind riseth often against the West, the South against the North, the Winde against the tyde, & one Passion fighteth with another," writes Thomas Wright in The Passions of the Mind in General (1604).

Scholarly interest in these meteorological comparisons has tended to focus on the body rather than the weather, yet historicist investigation of the "ecology of the passions" requires attention to the transaction between the porous body of Galenic humoralism and its environment. This is especially true for the early modern period when "weather" was construed anthropocentrically, signifying an unpredictable, perhaps God-given set of calamitous local events and prodigies – storms, earthquakes, bloody rains, or battles in the sky.

Shakespeare capitalizes on the fear and wonder associated with violent weather at key moments in the drama – the thunder and lightning at the opening of Macbeth, the storm at the center of King Lear. This paper will take a new look at Shakespeare's weather and the macrocosm-microcosm analogy which gives it psychological import.

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Performance: King Lear

 

February 20 - March 2, 2013

Jerry Herman Ring Theatre
1312 Miller Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146
305-284-3355

 

For more information and tickets, please visit:

www.as.miami.edu/theatrearts/ring.html

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Post-performance discussions with UM Shakespeare professors, the director, and actors on Sunday, February 24th (Anthony Barthelemy and Eugene Clasby), and Tuesday, February 26th(Pamela Hammons and Mihoko Suzuki). 


"BATHING IN REEKING WOUNDS: THE LIBERAL ARTS AND THE ARTS OF WAR"

‌Catharine R. Stimpson

Thursday, February 28, 2013
5:00 pm

The Sue and Leonard Miller Center
for Contemporary Judaic Studies
5202 University Drive
Merrick Building 105
Coral Gables, Florida 33146

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Focusing on Macbeth, Professor Stimpson will discuss how the humanities are crucial in arriving at complex understandings of war in its multifarious manifestations. Wars inspire documentation, invention, and creativity; and historical and literary analysis as well as interdisciplinary and transdiscplinary work in Trauma Studies — bringing together psychoanalysis and psychology, history, law, and medicine — helps us in healing the wounds of war. With new tools of research and communication — e.g., electronic and digital — the practitioners of the liberal arts are more prepared than ever to explore, describe, and explain war, as well as to widely distribute the resulting ideas and information, enabling us to arrive at a deeper awareness of history and self-recognition through such endeavors.

Catharine R. Stimpson is University Professor and Dean Emerita of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at New York University. She is currently affiliated with the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy, as well as with the NYU Law School. She served as President of the Modern Language Association and the Association of Graduate Schools. She was the first director of the Women’s Center at Rutgers, and the founding editor of Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. The author of a novel, Class Notes (1979, 1980), and a selection of essays on literature, culture, and education, Where the Meanings Are (1988), she has also published over 150 monographs, essays, stories, and reviews in such places as The Nation, New York Times Book Review, Critical Inquiry, and boundary 2. She was co-editor of the two-volume Library of America edition of the works of Gertrude Stein. Professor Stimpson has lectured at approximately 400 institutions in the United States and abroad. Her public service has included the chairpersonships of the New York State Council for the Humanities, the National Council for Research on Women, and the Ms. Magazine Board of Scholars; she has also served on the board of PBS. 

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"ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH AND THE CULTURE OF THE ART FAIR"

Laura Knott‌

Thursday, November 29, 2012
4:30 pm

Lowe Art Museum
1301 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33124

Art Basel Miami Beach powerfully represents the phenomenal expansion of contemporary art fairs since they began in 1967. While the first of the modern fairs was a small, cooperative venture, today's international art fairs profoundly influence cultural tourism and the business of buying and selling contemporary art. "Art Basel Miami Beach and the Culture of the Art Fair" looks at the artists and the galleries as they have been, as they are at this year's ABMB, and as they are likely to be in the future.

Laura Knott develops and manages exhibitions at the MIT Museum and teaches "Money and Ethics in the Contemporary Art World" at Tufts University. She holds a Master's degree from MIT in Visual Studies. Ms. Knott's career as an artist includes presentations at the documenta exhibition, online, and on public television. She is the editor of a book about Sky Art and the author of articles about contemporary art and museum practice.

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‌‌"OUT OF BOUNDS? A CRITIQUE OF THE NEW POLICIES ON HYPERANDROGENISM IN ELITE FEMALE ATHLETES"

Katrina Karkazis

 

Friday, April 27, 2012
4:30 pm

CAS Gallery/Wesley Foundation
1210 Stanford Drive
University of Miami

 

Katrina Karkazis is a medical anthropologist at the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Stanford; her first book, Fixing Sex: Intersex, Medical Authority, and Lived Experience (Duke University Press, 2008), looks at the question of how to treat infants whose bodies do not fit neatly into our scientific categories of “male” or “female,” from the perspective of doctors, parents, and adults with intersex conditions themselves.  She argues that by viewing intersexuality exclusively through a narrow medical lens we avoid much more difficult questions. Do gender atypical bodies require treatment? Should physicians intervene to control the “sex” of the body? Is “sex” as man-made as “gender”? Her talk will address her new work on how the world of sports is grappling with the question of sex variance in the wake of the controversy over South African runner Caster Semenya.

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‌"MY LOVE AFFAIR WITH ART"

Dr. Johnnetta Cole

Friday, March 23, 2012
4:30 pm

Lowe Art Museum
1301 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33124

 

 

 


Dr. Johnnetta B. Cole was appointed the Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) in March, 2009. Founded as a small museum on Capitol Hill in 1964, NMAfA became a part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1979, and in 1987 it moved to its current location on the National Mall. The museum's collection of over 10,000 objects represents nearly every area of the continent of Africa and contains a variety of media and art forms. NMAfA also has an extensive education program. Since the mid-1980's, Dr. Cole has worked with a number of Smithsonian programs. She currently serves on the Scholarly Advisory Board for the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, the construction of which will be completed on the National Mall by 2015.

Before assuming her current position, Johnnetta Cole had a long and distinguished career as an educator and humanitarian. Through her work as a college president, university professor and through her published works, speeches and community service she has consistently addressed the issues most important to her; creating racial and gender parity and redressing all other forms of inequality.

Dr. Cole served as president of Spelman College and Bennett College for Women. She is the only person to have served as president of these two historically Black colleges for women in the United States. She is also Professor Emerita of Emory University from which she retired as Presidential Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Women's Studies and African American Studies.  Johnnetta Cole has been awarded 55 honorary degrees and she is the recipient of numerous awards, including the TransAfrica Forum Global Public Service Award, the Radcliffe Medal, the Eleanor Roosevelt Val-Kill Medal, the 2001 Alexis de Tocqueville Award for Community Service from United Way of America, The Joseph Prize for Human Rights presented by the Anti-Defamation League, The Uncommon Height Award from the National Council of Negro Women, The John W. Gardner leadership Award from The Independent Sector, the Lenore and George W. Romney Citizen Volunteer Award from the Points of Light Foundation, Ebony magazines most influential 100 in 2010, George Washington Carver award 2011, Benjamin Franklin Creativity Laureate Award and Washingtonian Magazine's 100 most powerful women 2011.

Dr. Cole grew up in Jacksonville, Florida where in 1901 her maternal great-grandfather began the first insurance company in the state of Florida, an endeavor that earned him accolades as the state’s first black millionaire. She has conducted research in Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States, and she has authored and edited several books and scores of scholarly articles. Publisher’s Weekly stated, referring to Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities co-authored by Cole and Beverly Guy-Sheftall, “Thoughtful, provocative, concerned and urgent, this work ignites a much-needed debate over the state of true black community and the role of women within that community.”

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OF ANNAGRAMMATOLOGY:
DECODING THE RENAISSANCE TEXT

‌William Sherman

Thursday, March 29, 2012‌
4:30 pm

3rd Floor Conference Room
Richter Library
1300 Memorial Dr.
University of Miami

We are not used to the idea that anagrams might have anything serious to teach us: for most of us they are games we grow out of, and famous writers from Ben Jonson to Samuel Johnson, from John Dryden to T. S. Eliot, have dismissed their deployment in literature as trivial, empty, and even perverse -- a twisted art, as Dryden described it in his satirical poem MacFlecknoe, devoted to 'tortur[ing] one poor word ten thousand ways.' But Christopher Ricks has recently reminded us that Shakespeare's age was the veritable 'heyday of the anagram,' suggesting that the art of verbal recombination can be studied as 'a true assistance to art' in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In my illustrated lecture, I want to go further and suggest that anagrams may deserve a central place in a larger history, one with broader textual, cultural and intellectual dimensions. Bringing together some of the key figures in the birth of linguistics, literary criticism, psychoanalysis, cryptography and experimental art, anagrams offer a surprisingly useful lens for the processes by which modernity found itself in the hidden message of early modernity.

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Florida in the XVI Century: Discovery and Conquest

 

María Antonia Sáinz Sastre

 

Tuesday, October 11, 2011
11:00 am

CAS Gallery/Wesley Foundation
1210 Stanford Dr.
University of Miami

In her extensive study Florida in the Sixteenth Century: Exploration and Colonization (MAPFRE, 2011), María Antonia Sáinz Sastre recounts the saga of hardship, loss and calamity that befell so many Europeans who attempted to settle in Florida at the time. The lengthiest part of her book is dedicated to Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, the Adelantado from Asturias whose efforts resulted in the establishment of St. Augustine, the first permanent European settlement in North America. Sáinz Sastre uses in her study unique primary sources from the archives of the Marquis of Revillagigedo, a descendant of Menéndez de Avilés who was appointed Governor of Cuba in 1734.


INDEPENDENCE LOST:
THE GULF COAST AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Kathleen Duval

Associate Professor of History & Director of Undergraduate Studies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Thursday, October 6, 2011
4:30 pm

3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Drive
Richter Library

Kathleen DuVal’s lecture concerns the Revolutionary War on the Gulf Coast. There, Spaniards, Britons, Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Acadians, enslaved and free African Americans, and others—but not American revolutionaries—took advantage of the war to forward their own ambitions. “Independence Lost” tells an alternative story of the American Revolution with unexpected actors, forgotten events, and surprising consequences.

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THE FIERY TRIAL: ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND AMERICAN SLAVERY

Eric Foner

‌DeWitt Clinton Professor of History
Columbia University

Thursday, September 22, 2011
4:30 pm

Storer Auditorium
5250 University Drive
University of Miami

Winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in History, the Bancroft Prize, and the Lincoln Prize: from a master historian, the story of Lincoln's-and the nation's-transformation through the crucible of slavery and emancipation.

In this landmark work of deep scholarship and insight, Eric Foner gives us the definitive history of Lincoln and the end of slavery in America. Foner begins with Lincoln's youth in Indiana and Illinois and follows the trajectory of his career across an increasingly tense and shifting political terrain from Illinois to Washington, D.C. Although “naturally anti-slavery” for as long as he can remember, Lincoln scrupulously holds to the position that the Constitution protects the institution in the original slave states. But the political landscape is transformed in 1854 when the Kansas-Nebraska Act makes the expansion of slavery a national issue. 

   

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NIGHT-RULE: EMPIRES OF THE NONHUMAN IN MONTAIGNE, SHAKESPEARE, AND DESCARTES

Laurie Shannon

Associate Professor of English
Wender Lewis Teaching and Research Professor
Northwestern University


Thursday April 7, 2011
4:30 pm


3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Dr.
Richter Library

Ideas about certitude in human knowledge and about alleged differences in faculties between human and animal estate share a key historical pivot: Descartes's Discourse on Method. What does the question of species have to do with the history of skepticism -- and why? This lecture considers the underattended terms of debate between Montaigne and Descartes on the claims of animals, in order to show how Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream places species-defined limits on human authority instead of celebrating it.

   

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THE POLITICAL ORIGINS OF THE HISTORY PLAY IN ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND

Peter Lake

University Distinguished Professor of History
Professor of the History of Christianity, Divinity School
Vanderbilt University



Thursday March 24, 2011
4:30 pm


3rd Floor Conference Room
1300 Memorial Dr.
Richter Library

This lecture attempts to outline the political and ideological contexts out of which the history play developed; and the context in which it was written, staged, and consumed. To this end, a wide range of tract materials as well as an account of the political dynamics of Elizabeth’s reign from the late 1560s to the early 1590s will be considered. The lecture will also suggest the ways in which contemporaries may have read the history play politically.

  

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"NEW DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES"

Kenneth Price

Hillegass University Professor
of 19th Century American Literature
C0-Director, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Monday March 21, 2011  3:30 pm
3rd Floor Conference Room
Richter Library

 

‌Kenneth M. Price is the Hillegass University Professor of 19th  Century American Literature and co-director of the Center for  Digital Research in the Humanities at the University of  Nebraska–Lincoln ( http://cdrh.unl.edu/ ). Since 1995, Price  has served as co-director of the Walt Whitman Archive, an  electronic research and teaching tool that sets out to make Whitman's work accessible to scholars, students, and general readers. The Whitman Archive has been awarded grants from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the U. S. Department of Education, and the Institute for Museum and Library Services. In 2005, the Whitman Archive received a "We the People" grant from the NEH to build a permanent endowment to support ongoing editorial work; and in 2008, Price received a Digital Innovation Award from American Council of Learned Societies to edit Whitman's Civil War writings. He is a contributor to A Companion to Digital Literary Studies (2008) and his article, “Edition, Project, Database, Archive, Thematic Research Collection: What’s in a Name?” appeared in the summer 2008 issue (vol. 3, no. 3) of Digital Humanities Quarterly.

 

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POLICING AND THE SOCIAL ORDER IN JACK-THE-RIPPER'S LONDON

‌Victor Bailey

Charles W. Battey Distinguished Professor
of Modern British History
Director, Hall Center for the Humanities
University of Kansas

Wednesday February 23, 2011  4:30 pm
3rd Floor Conference Room
Richter Library

In 1888 the East End of London, where Jack-the-Ripper brutally murdered five prostitutes, was notorious as a site of poverty, crime, and immorality. Yet at the time many Victorians believed that crime had declined in the 1880s. Some historians attribute this decline to efficient, even ruthless policing. Professor Bailey will suggest that the commission and repression of crime cannot be understood outside the wider context of employment, family and neighborhood, immigration, charity and welfare, housing and local government, and the local magistrates’ courts.

  

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RESTAURANTS FOR THE REST OF US

‌‌Robert Appelbaum 

Professor of English Literature
Uppsala University, Sweden
Head of Department, Department of English and Creative Writing, Lancaster University

Wednesday February 16, 2011  7:00 pm
CAS Gallery
Wesley House

Can restaurants serve as a vehicle for cultural democracy? Can writing about restaurants do so? We have heard about palaces with Michelin stars, which none of us can afford. And we know all about fast food joints, which kill the soul while poisoning the body. But what about restaurants for the rest of us?

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ART AND ILLUMINATION DISCOURSE: PARISIAN VISUAL CULTURE IN THE ERA OF THOMAS EDISON

S. Hollis Clayson

‌Professor of Art History and History
Bergen Evans Professor in the Humanities
Director, Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities
Northwestern University


Thursday November 4, 2010 4:30 pm
CAS Gallery
Wesley House


The lecture will pose one central question: to what extent did the electrical revolution in artificial lighting technologies, and the intense conversation that it engendered, shape experimental forms of printmaking headquartered in Paris between 1879 and 1882?  Etchings by Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas will be emphasized.

  

 

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FOOD AND THE SENSES: PLEASURE, SIN AND GUILT IN SIXTEENTH CENTURY ITALIAN LITERATURE AND ART

Laura Giannetti

Associate Professor of Italian
Modern Languages and Literatures Department
University of Miami

Thursday April 22, 2010 3:30 pm
CAS Gallery
Wesley House

Two separate heavens awaited the dead in Ruzante’s Dialogo facetissimo: one for those who enjoyed the sensual world of food and sex and another reserved for those who lived malinconici, fasting and praying to God. Humanists, doctors, and food writers debated whether the concern for health or the pleasures of the senses should be the guiding principle in choosing food. Perhaps in the context of the Reformation the debate was resolved in favor of a concern for health and a tighter control of the body, the senses, and appetites; yet imaginative literature and artistic representations showed an increasing fascination with food, taste, and sensual pleasure. This paper will address how a discourse of food found in prescriptive literature was translated into and changed to empower the senses in the realm of the literary imagination.

  

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THE RISE OF A SUPERPOWER CHINA

Edward Friedman

Professor of Political Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Friday February 12, 2010 3:30 pm
CAS Gallery
Wesley House

Some well-informed analysts see China dominating the world in the years ahead and re-shaping politics in a direction favorable to authoritarianism rather than human rights and democracy. Others see China as a bubble economy that will inevitably burst. Yet others fear for a war between the present superpower, America, and the rising superpower, China. The Chinese Communist Party government, in contrast to each and all of these future projections, insists that China's rise will facilitate peace and prosperity. China therefore should be seen as a global moral pole.  This talk will probe what lies behind these clashing perspectives on the future. Whatever lies ahead, no one should doubt that the rise of China is a world-changing event perhaps as significant as the rise of Europe which started around 1500.  

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COSMOPOLITANISM, WOMEN, AND WAR: FROM VIRGINIA WOOLF'S THREE GUINEAS TO MARJANE SATRAPI'S PERSEPOLIS

Susan Stanford Friedman

Virginia Woolf Professor of English & Women's Studies
Sally Mead Hands Bascom Professor of English
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Thursday February 11, 2010 3:30 pm
CAS Gallery
Wesley House

What happens to the cosmopolitan dream of world citizenship during a time of war? What is women’s relationship to patriotism when the nation denies them full citizenship and uses the language of protection against violence to justify its circumscription of women’s rights? Virginia Woolf’s polemical essay on war Three Guineas (1938) and Marjane Satrapi’s bestselling memoir Persepolis (2000) explore these questions about gender, war, and world citizenship from their different standpoints in time and location. The lecture explores Three Guineas and Persepolis in the context of current debates about cosmopolitanism “from below” and argues that both women advocate a cosmofeminism “from the side”  that refuses loyalty to nation-states at war that do violence to their own citizens while claiming to protect them.  

  

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ALL IN THE CUBAN AMERICAN/SIT-COM FAMILY: 'QUE PASA USA?' (1975-1980)

Yeidy Rivero

‌Associate Professor of American Culture,
Screen Arts and Culture
University of Michigan

Friday January 29, 2010 4:30 pm
Roberto C. Goizueta Pavilion
2nd Floor Richter Library


¿Qué Pasa, USA? is America's first bilingual situation comedy. The program explores the trials and tribulations faced by the Peña family of Miami as they struggle to cope with a new country and a new language. The series focuses on the identity crisis of the  members of the family as they are pulled in one direction by their elders - who want to maintain Cuban values and traditions - and pulled in other directions by the pressures of living in a predominantly Anglo society.  Professor Rivero will examine how national and transnational cultural identities are constructed and negotiated through media discourses about race, ethnicity, nationality, and gender.  Her current research explores the ways in which television in 1950s Cuba was utilized as a commercial-national medium to re-articulate discourses of modernity.

  

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ANIMAL PASSIONS AND WILD JUSTICE: THE EMOTIONAL AND MORAL LIVES OF ANIMALS AND WHY THEY MATTER

Marc Bekoff

‌Professor Emeritus of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
University of Colorado-Boulder

Tuesday January 26, 2010 3:30 pm
CAS Gallery at Wesley House

There is much research clearly showing animals as emotional and empathic beings and displaying moral intelligence. In his talk, Bekoff will present numerous examples on the emotional lives of animals and make his case about animal morality, or what he calls “wild justice." He will focus on the details of social play behavior, or the many ways in which animals play cooperatively and fairly.

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THE ARGONAUTIC EXPEDITION: FROM FOLKTALE TO MYTH

James J. Clauss

‌Professor of Classics
Director of the University Honors Program
University of Washington

Wednesday, April 1st 2009

Professor Clauss will trace the evolution of the famed Argonautic expedition from a tale of personal growth to a myth that accounts for, perhaps even justifies, Greek expansion in the East and in North Africa, as well as hints at the origins of the long-standing conflict with the Persian Empire.

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SMITH THE CRITIC: MIMESIS, SYMPATHY, AND SATISFACTION

James Chandler

‌Franke Distinguished Professor
Director, Franke Institute for the Humanities
University of Chicago

Thursday, March 26th 2009

Though not best known for his work in criticism and aesthetics, Smith thought and wrote a great deal about such matters. He spent much of his later life on a major treatise on the “imitative arts,” which may have included the “Essay on the Imitative Arts,” posthumously published in 1795. Wordsworth, for one, had no use for Smith as a critic, or for any of the Scottish Enlightenment writers on literature and the arts. But Robert Burns was deeply influenced by Smith’s writing and so were other leading literary figures. Moreover, Smith was certainly one of the leading moral theorists of the eighteenth century, and his critical arguments are closely imbricated with the sorts of arguments he makes in the Theory of Moral Sentiments. To understand Smith’s complex challenge to the work of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, for example, it is necessary to see why Smith quarreled with Rousseau’s account of the imitative arts.

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