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SEPTEMBER 2016

Fall Reception (2015)

Fall Reception for Humanities Faculty & Graduate Students


Thursday
9-1-16
4:00 PM

Knights Physics Building Library, Room 334
For UM Humanities Faculty, Grad Students, and by Invitation


"Making Foreigners: Immigration and Citizenship Law in America, 1600-2000," Kunal Parker, Professor of Law

Headshot of Kunal Parker (Law)

‌Kunal Parker

Professor of Law & Dean's Distinguished Scholar
University of Miami

Making Foreigners:
Immigration and Citizenship Law in America, 1600–2000

Wednesday
9-7-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

This book reconceptualizes the history of U.S. immigration and citizenship law from the colonial period to the beginning of the twenty-first century by joining the histories of immigrants to those of Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino/a Americans, women, and the poor. Kunal Parker argues that during the earliest stages of American history, being legally constructed as a foreigner, along with being subjected to restrictions on presence and movement, was not confined to those who sought to enter the country from the outside, but was also used against those on the inside. Insiders thus shared important legal disabilities with outsiders. The book advances new ways of understanding the relationship between foreignness and subordination over the long span of American history.

Kunal Parker is Professor of Law and Dean’s Distinguished Scholar at the University of Miami. He has held fellowships at New York University Law School, Cornell Law School, Queens University in Belfast, Ireland, and the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, Illinois. Prior to entering the teaching profession, Professor Parker worked as an associate at the New York law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton. His first book, Common Law, History, and Democracy in America, 1790–1900: Legal Thought before Modernism was published by Cambridge University Press in 2011. His teaching areas and interests include American legal history, estates and trusts, immigration and nationality law, and property.


 

Grant-Writing Workshop for Early Career Scholars


Thursday
9-15-16
4:00 PM

Workshop:
Otto G. Richter Library
Third Floor Conference Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

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This workshop is primarily intended for early career scholars who wish to learn more about the art and craft of writing for grants in the humanities. We welcome, however, any and all scholars who wish to learn more about strategies for successful grant-writing or who wish to share their own experiences. The discussion will be led by three members of the UM humanities faculty who have themselves been the recipients of major grants, such as NEH and ACLS. We will discuss not only how to write a successful proposal but also how to think about deciding which grants to apply for and when it makes most sense to do so in terms of one’s own career.

Pamela Hammons, Professor and Chair of English; Amie Thomasson, Professor of Philosophy; and Ashli White, Associate Professor of History.
Moderator: Mary Lindemann, Professor and Chair of History.


 

Grant-Writing Workshop for Postdoctoral Fellowships


Friday
9-16-16
12:30 PM

Workshop:
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Faculty & Grad Students

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This workshop is directed to PhD students who are very close to finishing their dissertations or have just done so. Postdoctoral fellowships come in a variety of different forms; many are residential, some are not. They all provide, however, an excellent way for recent PhDs to gain additional experience teaching (for the postdoctoral fellowships with teaching responsibilities) and time to spend on the research and writing of one’s first monograph or other piece of major scholarly writing. Three Assistant Professors of the UM faculty who themselves have recently held prestigious postdoctoral fellowships will lead the discussion.

Krista Goff, Assistant Professor of History; Jessica Rosenberg, Assistant Professor of English; Allison Schifani, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities.
Moderator: Mary Lindemann, Professor and Chair of History.


"Galileo's Middle Finger" by Alice Dreger

Alice Dreger

Historian of Medicine and Science

Galileo’s Middle Finger: Why Social Progress Depends on Freedom of Inquiry (Public Lecture)

Should We Be Adding "I" to "LGBTQ"? (Public Lecture)


Thursday
9-22-16
12:30 PM

Seminar: 20 Years of Working Toward Intersex Rights
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Faculty & Grad Students

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Thursday
9-22-16
7:00 PM

Public Lecture: Galileo's Middle Finger
Storer Auditorium
Public Invited

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Friday
9-23-16
4:30 PM

Public Lecture: LGBTQ
United Wesley Gallery
Public Invited

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“[A] smart, delightful book. Galileo’s Middle Finger is . . . an account of the author’s transformation ‘from an activist going after establishment scientists into an aide-de-camp to scientists who found themselves the target of activists like me’and back again . . . I suspect most readers will find that [Dreger’s] witnessing of these wild skirmishes provides a splendidly entertaining education in ethics, activism, and science.”New York Times Book Review

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OCTOBER 2016

2015-2016 Center for the Humanities Fellows Symposium

2015-16 Center for the Humanities Faculty & Dissertation Fellows


Friday
10-14-16
10:30am

School of Nursing
Executive Board Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

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Session 1 : 10:30am - 11:30am
• "The General Strike as Nonstate Space," Joel Nickels (English)
• "Sideshow Faints: Structuring Embodied Responses and Turning a Tip," Stephen Di Benedetto (Theatre Arts)


Session 2 — 11:45am - 12:45pm
• "La Meurthe Occupée: French Administrators Under Foreign Rule, 1814-1818," Valerie Nicole Chamorro (History)
• "The Legacy of the State: Political and Legal Machinery under François Duvalier," Jennifer Garcon (History)


LUNCH: 12:45pm - 1:45pm


Session 3 — 1:45pm - 2:45pm

• "Hunting and Falconry at the Court of King John," Hugh Thomas (History)
• "Boccaccio's 'The Prince' or Griselda as Twice an Ultimately Victorious Victim (Decameron, X, 10)," Guido Ruggiero (History)

Jose Luis Guerin with "La Academia de las Musas" poster

Presented by the Department of Philosophy

Cosponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the Department of Cinema and Interactive Media, the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, and the Joseph Carter Memorial Fund

The Films of José Luis Guerín: Wandering Through Shadow and Silence

Linda C. Ehrlich, Case Western Reserve University


Tuesday
10-25-16
6:00PM

Bill Cosford Cinema
5030 Brunson Drive, Memorial Building 227
Coral Gables, FL 33146

Experimental filmmaker José Luis Guerín (b. 1960) makes films that defy categories. Neither strictly documentary nor fiction, Guerín’s films wander through silence and shadows, inviting the viewer to ponder the fragility and resilience of the cinematic image.

As background to the viewing of Guerín’s most recent film La academia de las musas (The Academy of the Muses, 2015), Dr. Linda Ehrlich will introduce some of Guerín’s earlier works such as Tren de sombras (Train of Shadows, 1997), En construcción (Work in Progress, 2001), Unas fotos en la ciudad de Sylvia (Some Photos in the City of Sylvia, 2007), and Dos cartas a Ana (Two Letters to Ana, 2011). In particular, she will examine how Guerín uses shadows and “the absent voice” to indicate the expansive power of the cinema, beyond the frame.

Dr. Ehrlich’s writings about José Luis Guerín have appeared in the online journal Senses of Cinema and in her book Cinematic Reveries. She has spent time with the director in New York City and Barcelona.

Linda C. Ehrlich, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures at Case Western Reserve University, has published extensively on world cinema, including Spanish cinema. Her edited book, The Cinema of Víctor Erice: An Open Window, introduces this important Spanish film director to a wide audience. Her newest book, Cinematic Reveries: Gestures, Stillness, Water, offers a collection of prose poems about selected films. Dr. Ehrlich’s taped commentary on the Spanish film The Spirit of the Beehive (El espíritu de la colmena) appears on the Criterion DVD.  She has also edited and annotated the memoir of Juan Luis Buñuel (eldest son of filmmaker Luis Buñuel): Good Films, Cheap Wine, Few Friends: A Memoir. (For more information, please visit her website: http://braidednarrative.com)


‌‌‌
"Saynatakuna: Mascaras y Transfiguraciones en Paukartambo," Carlos Aguirre, Associate Professor of Art & Art History


‌Carlos Llerena Aguirre

Associate Professor of Art & Art History
University of Miami

Saynatakuna: Máscaras y Transfiguraciones en Paukartambo
(Saynatakuna: Masks and Transfigurations in Paukartambo)
(This event will be presented in English)

Wednesday
10-26-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Saynatakuna is an ethnographic film as well as a book documenting the film. It tells the story of the mask-makers and dancers during the festival of the Virgen del Carmen in Paukartambo. The dancers reinterpret their history and the socio-po­litical forces that drive them to perform their rituals of magic and resistance. The eighteen dance troupes reenact and satirize the different ethnic groups that have passed through Paukartambo since the beginning of time. They tell a story of the past, the present, and the future, wearing handmade colorful masks and intricate beaded costumes.

Peruvian-born Llerena Aguirre is Associate Professor of Art in Digital Imaging, Multimedia, and Graphic Design at the University of Miami. He directs and produces independent films from his Miami-based in-house studio. His video art and documentaries have been screened and officially selected by many international venues including FLAVIA 2015 (Festival Latinoamericano de Videoarte), Centro Borges, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Lloret International Festival, Lloret de Mar, Spain; ISCHIA Film Festival, Naples, Italy; MAC-Lima, solo exhibition, Permanent Collection, Lima, Peru; TOLFA International Short Film Festival 2013, Rome, Italy; Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida; and OMNI Urban Intervention, juried exhibit, Art Basel, Miami, Florida. Aguirre represented Peru and the USA with his woodcuts in the Norsk Internasjonal Grafikk Biennale, Norway; Pacific States Biennial National Print Exhibition, USA; and The Xylon Graphische International Triennale, Switzerland. He is the recipient of artist-in-residence awards from the Frans Masareel Centrum in Belgium and the Venice Printmaking Studio in Venice, Italy. Aguirre has published woodcuts in international journals, books, magazines, children's books, and newspapers. His woodcuts are in the Library of Congress Permanent Collection.

Click here to watch the movie trailer for "Saynatakuna"


 

Expanding Career Opportunities for PhDs in the Humanities & Social Sciences

Stephen Ortega

Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Program in History/Archives Management, Simmons College of Arts and Sciences

Thursday
10-27-16
12:30 PM

Seminar:
School of Nursing, Executive Board Room
For UM Faculty & Grad Students in the Humanities and Social Sciences

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As many students shift away from studies in the humanities and enroll in professional programs, questions have been raised as to the value of a graduate degree in history, philosophy, or literature outside of a career in academia. Yet as new creative and information industries emerge that involve the analysis and the assessment of significant amounts of information, skills that are essential in the humanities like close critical reading, use of multiple sources, and engaging writing can be used to secure employment outside of teaching. As director of a large graduate program in history and archives at Simmons College, Professor Ortega will explore the ways in which students have secured gainful employment in archives, libraries, architectural firms, museums, and the tourist industry, while also giving a broad overview of the ways in which people are using their PhDs in innovative ways.

Stephen Ortega is Associate Professor and Director of the Dual Degree Graduate Program in Archives Management and History at Simmons College. He is the co-author of a world history textbook, Thinking Past: Questions and Problems in World History to 1750 (Oxford University Press, 2014) in which every chapter asks different questions such as: What is an empire? What led to the rise of universal religions? His scholarly book, Negotiating Transcultural Relations in the Early Modern Mediterranean: Ottoman-Venetian Encounters (Ashgate, 2014), centers on relations between Venice and the Ottoman Empire. His present research looks at ways that video games can be incorporated into the history classroom. He is also working on a project in Barcelona, examining the legal mechanisms used to support economic and political expansion over both surrounding territories and places in the Mediterranean.


New Voices on Digital Humanities @ UM (Logo)


Friday
10-28-16
12:30pm

School of Nursing
Executive Board Room
Public Invited

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Digital Humanities IRG Co-Convener

 ‌
Allison Schifani
, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures
Digital Refusals: Advocacy, Resistance, and Radical Epistemologies in the Digital Humanities

 

Paige Morgan, co-convener for the Center for the Humanities Digital Humanities Interdisciplinary Research Group

 

‌Paige Morgan, Digital Humanities Librarian
Field Crystallization: How Digital Humanities is Evolving

 

More Information >>

NOVEMBER 2016

"Quest for Power: European Imperialism and the Making of Chinese Statecraft," Stephen Halsey, Associate Professor of History

Stephen Halsey, Associate Professor of History, University of Miami

‌Stephen Halsey

Associate Professor of History
University of Miami

Quest for Power:
European Imperialism and the Making of Chinese Statecraft

*** RESCHEDULED ***

Wednesday
11-2-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

China’s history in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries has often been framed as a long coda of imperial decline, played out during its last dynasty, the Qing (1644-1912). Quest for Power presents a sweeping reappraisal of this narrative. Stephen Halsey traces the origins of China’s great-power status in the twentieth century to this era of supposed decadence and decay. Threats from European and Japanese imperialism and the growing prospect of war triggered China’s most innovative state-building efforts since the Qing dynasty’s founding.

Stephen Halsey is Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami. His research and teaching focus on modern China but also engage the fields of environmental history, economic history, comparative colonialism, and global history. He completed his doctoral work at the University of Chicago and has also studied at National Taiwan University and Beijing University. Before coming to Miami, he held the Alice Kaplan Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities at Northwestern University and participated in an interdisciplinary teaching program called “The Great Society.” Halsey has held fellowships with the Fulbright-Hays program, the Blakemore Foundation, FLAS, and the Earhart Foundation.


Martin Luther for Lyndal Roper  (CANCELLED)

Lyndal Roper

Regius Professor of Modern History, University of Oxford

Luther, Dreams, and the Reformation (Public Lecture)

*** CANCELLED ***


Wednesday
11-2-16
12:30 PM

Seminar: New Perspectives on Martin Luther and the Reformation
Otto G. Richter Library, Third Floor Conference Room
For UM Humanities Faculty & Grad Students

Thursday
11-3-16
7:00 PM

Public Lecture
Shoma Hall, School of Communications
Public Invited

“[Martin Luther: Renegade and Prophet is] among the most interesting, provocative, and original biographies of Luther to appear in recent years. . . . This unfailingly inventive and compelling account is a welcome gust of fresh air. . . . Anyone seriously interested in one of the most influential figures of the last half-millennium will need to make time to read this one.”Literary Review

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"Novel Nostalgias: The Aesthetics of Antagonism in Nineteenth Century U.S Literature," John Funchion, Associate Professor of English

 

‌John Funchion

Associate Professor of English
University of Miami

Novel Nostalgias:
The Aesthetics of Antagonism in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature

Wednesday
11-9-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...
Click here to watch the event via Livestream
 

Novel Nostalgias establishes how the longing to recover a lost home or past drove some of the central conflicts of the nineteenth-century United States. Providing one of the few U.S. literary histories that examines cultural material from both before and after the Civil War, John Funchion argues that a diverse array of novels, from William Wells Brown’s Clotel to L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, imagined new politically—and antagonistically—charged communities through forms of nostalgic longing.

John Funchion is Associate Professor of English at the University of Miami. His essays have appeared in Early American Literature, Modern Language Quarterly, Modernist Cultures, and The Henry James Review. He has co-edited and contributed an essay to Mapping Regions in Early American Writing (University of Georgia Press, 2015). He is currently at work on two new projects. His second book manuscript, Reading against the Law: Localities of Dissent in the Early Republic, establishes how regional writers in the U.S. engaged novelists, poets, revolutionaries, and legal thinkers across the Atlantic and throughout the Caribbean to challenge the rising dominance of legal and literary federalism in the early nineteenth century. He has also begun developing a digital humanities project, [alt] Periodicals, which will provide a searchable archive of radical and alternative periodicals published in the U.S. between 1865 and 1919.


DECEMBER 2016

"Ethics, Medicine, and Information Technology: Intelligent Machines and the Transformation of Health Care," Kenneth Goodman, Professor of Medicine and Director of Bio-Ethics Program

 

‌Kenneth Goodman

Professor of Medicine and Director of the Bioethics Program
University of Miami

Ethics, Medicine, and Information Technology:
Intelligent Machines and the Transformation of Health Care

Wednesday
12-7-16

8:00 PM
Books & Books
Public Invited
Directions...

Listen to the Podcast

 

Information technology is transforming the practices of medicine, nursing, and biomedical research. Computers can now render diagnoses and prognoses more accurately than humans. The concepts of privacy and confidentiality are evolving as data moves from paper to silicon to clouds. Big data promises financial wealth, as well as riches of information and benefits to science and public health. Online access and mobile apps provide patients with an unprecedented connection to their health and health records. This transformation is as unsettling as it is exhilarating. With chapters spanning issues from professionalism and quality to mobile health and bioinformatics, this book establishes what will become the “core curriculum” in ethics and health informatics, a growing field which encourages truly inter- and multidisciplinary inquiry.

Kenneth W. Goodman, Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine and jointly of Philosophy, Public Health Sciences, Health Informatics, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Nursing and Health Studies. He directs the University of Miami Bioethics Program, a WHO Collaborating Center for Ethics and Global Health Policy, and the Florida Bioethics Network. His research has focused on ethics and health information technology and on ethics in epidemiology and public health. He has also emphasized international projects and has worked extensively in Latin America and Europe. He has served on the external ethics committee for the CDC and is a member of the American College of Epidemiology’s Ethics Committee. He is the author of Ethics and Evidence-Based Medicine (Cambridge University Press, 2003) and editor of The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century (Oxford University Press, 2009).